animism

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an·i·mism

(an'i-mizm),
The view that all things in nature, both animate and inanimate, contain a spirit or soul; part of many religious doctrines that a soul or spirit dwells within people and nature.
See also: animatism.
[L. anima, soul]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

animism

A term of historic interest for belief that inanimate objects (e.g., earth, wind, fire, et al) are alive, move with purpose and intent, and have an agenda. The current equivalent is the Gaia hypothesis, which is widely regarded by mainstream biologists as a form of pseudoscience.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

animism

(an′ĭ-mizm) [ anima + -ism]
Attribution of spiritual qualities and mental capabilities to nonhuman living creatures, e.g., animals or trees, or to inanimate objects, e.g., mountains.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

animism

The belief held by many primitive peoples that a spirit resides within every object, controlling its existence and influencing events in the natural world.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It would be of interest to Orang Asli Studies/Malay/South East Asian Studies, the study of animistic belief as well as to the anthropology and sociology of religion, shamanism/healing and indigenous psychology.
Although it is suggested that anthropocentric and animistic misconceptions are effective in cognitive structuring of aliveness concept, it is
However, Korea's Christian segment is growing, now at roughly 30 percent (14 million), thus animistic beliefs are decreasing.
It also seems clear that such theories are not purely an outcome of biology (as the child's animistic theories seem to be), but are largely products of the influence of the culture in which a person lives.
The English biochemist Rupert Sheldrake, a staunch (post-scientific) animistic revivalist, points towards how
Even if the new materialists had completely differing intentions, their work could be read as a symptom of the same animistic political economy that birthed the Supreme Court decision that corporations are nonhuman persons.
1977: 241-66) distinguish three distinctive, interwoven strands of village religion: Buddhist, Brahmanical, animistic. More recently Pattana Kitiarsa has challenged the often employed terminology of 'syncretism' and argues that 'hybridisation' more aptly encompasses the changes in Thai popular religion that have occurred under the impact of religious commodification and capitalist consumerism ('Beyond syncretism: Hybridization of popular religion in Thailand, JSEAS, 36, no.
Balinese Hinduism, the religion of over 90% of the population has roots in Indian Hinduism and in Buddhism, and adopted the animistic traditions of the indigenous people.
Yet even as they freely adapted narrative strategies such as expressionism, surrealism, and the absurd, many of their stories germinated from legends, ancient myths, and animistic beliefs from Mexico's pre-Hispanic past.
But the question is whether that respect could be gained by performing violence and indulging in 'animistic behaviour.'
His attitude evolved from an initial Eurocentric ambivalence towards the "dark race" in 1922 to an immersion in the timeless "animistic vision" of the Indians during his second period in New Mexico, from 1924 to 1925.