animism


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Related to animism: animatism

an·i·mism

(an'i-mizm),
The view that all things in nature, both animate and inanimate, contain a spirit or soul; part of many religious doctrines that a soul or spirit dwells within people and nature.
See also: animatism.
[L. anima, soul]

animism

A term of historic interest for belief that inanimate objects (e.g., earth, wind, fire, et al) are alive, move with purpose and intent, and have an agenda. The current equivalent is the Gaia hypothesis, which is widely regarded by mainstream biologists as a form of pseudoscience.

animism

(an′ĭ-mizm) [ anima + -ism]
Attribution of spiritual qualities and mental capabilities to nonhuman living creatures, e.g., animals or trees, or to inanimate objects, e.g., mountains.

animism

The belief held by many primitive peoples that a spirit resides within every object, controlling its existence and influencing events in the natural world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subaltern animism calls for a reconceptualisation of spaces whereby urbanisation itself be re-understood as a process of co-production by humans and nonhumans.
Animism: Animism was coined by anthropologist Edward Burnett Tylor (1871), the term animism refers not to a type of religion, but to a theory of religion.
As with The Seven Veils of Seth, this novel also overlays animism with the symbolism and mythology of the monotheisms in presenting the worldview to which the desert is central.
Before I go into a detailed exploration of the different social practices that surround lulik in the Laclubar subdistrict and of the social dynamics that this threatening and awe-inspiring force inspires, let me consider two fundamental theoretical approaches that are useful for understanding its significance: first the sociological approach to the sacred advanced by Emile Durkheim, and second, recently reinvigorated anthropological approaches to animism.
In their classic, ground-breaking study, Vinay and Darbelnet define the concept of animism in the following terms:
Underlying his notion of life-world is the tradition of animism, which is epitomized by the word gotagai, a word from the Minamata dialect that means "we're all in this together.
Anthropologists have discussed the question of whether traditional animism has been replaced by modern money-based fetishism, (21) but I will leave this question alone and focus on the need for a revisited Christian pneumatology in the context of fetishization.
The question reader-groups may want to discuss is: What do we stand to lose by embracing this new paradigm of Christian animism and the notion of God's "subscendence"?
Whether defending lust, close reading Hardy's "If It's Ever Spring Again" or James's "Tree of Knowledge," reflecting upon freedom of expression "in times like these," explaining animism or the proper manner of deploying Zyklon-B, pondering the "unused syntactical space" within any sentence, or eureking the reason "reality needs appearance to complete it," Gass is invariably eloquent, trenchant, moral.
In popular usage, animism means the worship of animals, trees and rocks.
Animism tells us that objects can be "charged" with an aura that extends beyond their physical properties.
For many their spiritual beliefs of animism and ancestor worship are strongly entwined with cultural identity.