animism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to animism: animatism

an·i·mism

(an'i-mizm),
The view that all things in nature, both animate and inanimate, contain a spirit or soul; part of many religious doctrines that a soul or spirit dwells within people and nature.
See also: animatism.
[L. anima, soul]

animism

A term of historic interest for belief that inanimate objects (e.g., earth, wind, fire, et al) are alive, move with purpose and intent, and have an agenda. The current equivalent is the Gaia hypothesis, which is widely regarded by mainstream biologists as a form of pseudoscience.

animism

(an′ĭ-mizm) [ anima + -ism]
Attribution of spiritual qualities and mental capabilities to nonhuman living creatures, e.g., animals or trees, or to inanimate objects, e.g., mountains.

animism

The belief held by many primitive peoples that a spirit resides within every object, controlling its existence and influencing events in the natural world.
References in periodicals archive ?
He has attempted such a task in his groundbreaking work on Amerindian perspectivism-an ontology he defines as "perpendicular" and incommensurable to ours (contrary to Descola, who classifies as a variant of animism; see Latour 2009).
Jru' animism is mostly concerned with the complexity of communication and personhood, while cash cropping elaborates complexity in relation to objects like mills and fertilizer.
Apart from discussing how Nage views on what is and what is not alive might locate them ontologically in relation to similar groups, I consider how this case prospectively contributes to recent discussion of 'animism' and, conversely, how newer theories of animism might inform an understanding of Nage thought and practice.
In Thus Spoke for Uncle, he has devoted three full chapters--which bear the following titles: "Africa, Its Races and Its Civilization," "Africa and the External World," and "African Animism."--to investigate pre-colonial Africa and the study of the religious sentiments of African people.
The new animism (or animic) models have rarely been applied to the Southeast Asian region which has, however, always provided case examples of animism (although see Tsintjilonis 2004).
In Al-Koni's worldview, contrary to recent conceptualisations which tend to polarise animism and the Abrahamic faiths, the monotheisms productively realign but essentially perpetuate the fundamental relationship with self, other and world created by animism.
Animism is a compelling, challenging album that is definitely worth adding to any collection.
This suspenseful debut, first in a romantic fantasy series, is filled with animism, magical storytelling, and lyrical prose.
The authors in this volume engage critically with the thinkers who have done most to formulate relational approaches: Viveiros de Castro's perspectivism, Descola's divisions of animism, totemism, analogism and naturalism, and especially the subtle and thought-provoking work of Ingold.
The Southeast Asian region is a mix of various faiths ranging from the predominant Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism, to Animism and Confucianism as well as Christianity.