animal

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animal

 [an´ĭ-mal]
1. a living organism having sensation and the power of voluntary movement and requiring for its existence oxygen and organic food; animals comprise one of the five kingdoms in the most widely used classification of living organisms.
2. any member of the animal kingdom other than a human being.
3. of or pertaining to such an organism.
control animal an untreated animal otherwise identical in all respects to one that is used for purposes of experiment; used for checking results of treatment.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl),
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

(ăn′ə-məl)
n.
1. Any of numerous multicellular eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Metazoa (or Animalia) that ingest food rather than manufacturing it themselves and are usually able to move about during at least part of their life cycle. Sponges, jellyfishes, flatworms, mollusks, arthropods, and vertebrates are animals.
2. An animal organism other than a human, especially a mammal.
Drug slang A regionally popular term for LSD
Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action

animal

Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action. See Cat, Cow, Dog, Fish, Horse, Monkey, Pig, Sentinel animal, Snake. Vox populi Etc.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

any member of the animal kingdom: organisms that are multicellular and eukaryotic which possess non-photosynthetic, wall-less cells. In some classifications, certain unicellular organisms such as PROTOZOANS are also included.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Wyn said the EU proposals were firmly opposed by Welsh livestock farmers and agricultural merchants which handle animal medicines because many treatments are used safely and routinely by farmers without the need for veterinary intervention.
He said it was obvious that animal medicines must be sensibly regulated but the UK's current registration system was sufficient for the task.
'I have received many letters from concerned distributors of animal medicines in Wales who fear for their livelihoods at a time when the rural economy is still struggling to recover,' he said.
The Animal Health Alliance warned yesterday that proposed changes to European animal medicine regulations could mean a vet's prescription could be needed for routine activities.
``The availability of animal medicines is vital to farmers to enable them to care properly for stock.
The staff have now been trained by AMTRA, an independent regulatory body whose task is to ensure that the marketing and distribution of animal medicines in the UK is undertaken in a responsible manner by AMTRA qualified persons.
A EUROPEAN Union proposal on animal medicines could lead to the loss of hundreds of jobs in Welsh rural areas and lead to the closure of farm suppliers, it has been claimed.
The EU proposals on veterinary medicinal products would prevent the sale of animal medicines for farm livestock and horses without a prescription.
From left: Euro-MP Jonathan Evans with Andrew Davies, Glamorgan NFU county chairman, and Peter John of Arthur John and Co, discussing the EU reccommendation to introduce new legislation for animal medicines
"It is a disgrace that at a time when the farming industry in this country is on its knees, our farmers are still paying what could be described as extortionate prices for essential animal medicines.

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