animal fat


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A general term for saturated fatty acids of animal—beef, pork, lamb—origin, which are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, small intestine, colorectal, prostate and breast cancers

animal fat

Clinical nutrition A general term for saturated fatty acids of animal–beef, pork, lamb origin, which are associated with an ↑ risk of colorectal—CA. See Fatty acid, Saturated fatty acid. Cf Unsaturated fatty acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
If animal fat were a culprit, as some studies suggest, high-fat dairy foods like whole milk and cheese would also put the prostate at risk.
The IR spectrometer revealed that the proteins and fats in low-fat cooked derivates formulated with this stabilizer system as animal fat replacer showed weak lipid-protein interactions, which implies more physical entrapment of the emulsion within the meat matrix.
It makes sense to use animal fat. And by selling more animal fat, Tyson can boost earnings.
"The market for animal fats has narrowed because of mad cow disease," said Powell.
One pattern assumed the ingestion of 15 grams of heavily contaminated animal fat per day and resulted in a 75% increase in dioxin body burden.
But the case against animal fats i far from closed.
"Our recommendations are the same as the Public Health Service's Healthy Heart Diet, which includes eating more green vegetables and less animal fat," says Birnbaum.
However, several previous studies have suggested that eating patterns -- principally, diets high in animal fat, meat, and milk -- might be linked to the disease.
There could be a ban on marketing products from installations that have been declared suspect or a ban on exports of animal fat given as feed to chickens, or more generally, stricter measures could be taken such as an embargo on exports of chickens and eggs from Belgium (and other countries).
"Eating meals with a high content of animal fat and low in vitamins and fibre may encourage the cancer to develop.
Her organization encourages women to minimize their contaminant risk by avoiding pesticides and cutting down on animal fat during pregnancy and lactation.
"It's very clear that people who eat a lot of fruits and vegetables and don't eat a lot of fat, especially animal fat, have a lower risk of colon cancer," says physician John Baron of Dartmouth Medical School in Hanover, New Hampshire.