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Related to animal bite: insect bite, dog bite, first aid

animal

 [an´ĭ-mal]
1. a living organism having sensation and the power of voluntary movement and requiring for its existence oxygen and organic food; animals comprise one of the five kingdoms in the most widely used classification of living organisms.
2. any member of the animal kingdom other than a human being.
3. of or pertaining to such an organism.
control animal an untreated animal otherwise identical in all respects to one that is used for purposes of experiment; used for checking results of treatment.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl),
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

(ăn′ə-məl)
n.
1. Any of numerous multicellular eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Metazoa (or Animalia) that ingest food rather than manufacturing it themselves and are usually able to move about during at least part of their life cycle. Sponges, jellyfishes, flatworms, mollusks, arthropods, and vertebrates are animals.
2. An animal organism other than a human, especially a mammal.
Drug slang A regionally popular term for LSD
Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action

animal

Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action. See Cat, Cow, Dog, Fish, Horse, Monkey, Pig, Sentinel animal, Snake. Vox populi Etc.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

any member of the animal kingdom: organisms that are multicellular and eukaryotic which possess non-photosynthetic, wall-less cells. In some classifications, certain unicellular organisms such as PROTOZOANS are also included.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Types of wounds from animal bites range from abrasions, lacerations, punctures, and additional injuries from mauling (avulsion, crush, fracture, dislocation, or amputation).
The attitude was changed significantly (P < 0.05) among the participants with respect to the indication of anti-rabies vaccination among pregnant and lactating mothers, following the bite by the younger animals, in cases of repeated bites and about diet restrictions in animal bite victims [Table 5].
Of all animal bites, the largest proportion (61.6%) occurred inside the house.
Emergency Medicine Animal Bite Infection Study Group.
Adults presented to the Antirabic Center with animal bites in larger numbers compared to children.
So what needs to be done after an animal bite? Prompt and thorough cleaning of the wound site is the first line of defense.
382 emergency calls were made to Mersey Regional Ambulance reporting animal bites in Merseyside and Cheshire.
Interviews with the patient's family members who resided in Florida indicated that he had not reported an animal bite and that he avoided contact with domestic and wild animals.
Most studies of animal bite wounds have focused on the isolation of Pasteurella multocida, [23,24] disregarding the role of anaerobes.
[4] Many factors interact with each other which makes children more vulnerable for animal bite. Some of which include, the inability of the child to defend itself against dog, the inability of a child to accurately read nonverbal communication signals from a dog, the style of interaction a child directs to a dog, size of the child and the interaction between a dog's behavioural tendencies and the cognitive/developmental stage of the child.
Nicole Perreras, medical specialist 3, Head of Animal Bite Clinic at the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) in Alabang, Muntinlupa, stated that the number of animal bite patients in the Philippines has become more alarming over the years, while rabies cases have always been 'pretty stable'.