aniline

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aniline

 [an´ĭ-lin]
an oily liquid from coal tar and indigo or prepared by reducing nitrobenzene; the parent substance of colors or dyes derived from coal tar. Aniline and its derivatives are an important cause of serious industrial poisoning. Household items such as indelible ink, shoe dye, and some wax crayons have been associated with poisonings. Routes of exposure include the respiratory tract, the mouth, and percutaneous absorption. Aniline from the mother can cross the placental barrier to poison a fetus. The predominant acute toxic effect is methemoglobinemia.

an·i·line

(an'i-lin, -lēn),
An oily, colorless, or brownish liquid, of aromatic odor and acrid taste, which is the parent substance of many synthetic dyes; derived from benzene by the substitution of the group -NH2 for one of the hydrogen atoms. Aniline is highly toxic, may cause industrial poisoning, and may be carcinogenic.
[Ar. an-nil, indigo]

an·i·line

(an'i-lin)
An oily, colorless or brownish liquid, of aromatic odor and acrid taste, which is the parent substance of many synthetic dyes. Aniline is highly toxic and may cause industrial poisoning.
[Ar. an-nil, indigo]
References in periodicals archive ?
The first aniline dyes were limited by the need to use a substance known as a mordant to fix the dye permanently to the textile fiber, a requirement that added an extra step to the dyeing process.[5,6] In 1883, an obscure young chemist named Paul Bottiger found a more direct method.[7] At the time of his discovery, Bottiger was working in the dyestuff chemical laboratory of the Friedrich Bayer Company in Elberfeld, Germany.
12 x 2-1/2" round head 2 screws (for hanging) 3/4" brads 10 3/8" x 1-1/2" dowel pins 4 Aniline dye stain, dark walnut 1 pint color(*) oil finish 1 pint (*) Non-grain-raising aniline dye stain is available from Wood Finishing Supply Co.
Coomaraswamy's call for swadeshi in colour via a critique of aniline dyes in the opening decade of the 20th century was, in fact, an inquest upon the industrial uses of scientific research.
Successful examples include reductions in lung cancer and mesothelioma following bans on asbestos, reductions in bladder cancer after elimination of aniline dyes, reductions in leukemia following imposition of controls on benzene, and termination of hepatic angiosarcoma in chemical workers following introduction of closed-circuit technology for vinyl chloride polymerization (Christiani 2011).
Subjects presented here include microbiology's Ferdinand Cohn and concepts of the discreteness of nature, German-Jewish chemists and Raphael Meldola in the search for aniline dyes, Felix Hansdorff's career in cultural and mathematical modernism, Leon Michaelis and Emil Abderhalden and the workings habits of Jewish and non-Jewish chemists in Germany, Zionist men of science between nature and nurture, Einstein and reform Judaism as it relates to the Fries school, value-based genetic studies of ethnic communities in Israel, German and Israeli attitudes about reproductive genetics, pragmatic and dogmatic physics in 1938, and Jewish emigrants and German Scientists after World War II.
Way back in 1895 aniline dyes, made from coal tar, were proven to cause bladder cancer.
While the German chemists, under Domagk, tried for years to attach sulfur to various aniline dyes, a team of French scientists showed that it was the sulfur, and not the dyes, that had the antibacterial effect.
By the mid-1800s, the development of coal-derived aniline dyes had dramatically reduced the demand for logwood.
See your doctor if you suspect you may have been harmed by exposure to toxins such as aniline dyes, mercury or carbon monoxide.
Other risk factors include environmental and occupational exposures such as aniline dyes; combustion gases; and soot from coal, petroleum by-products, and chemical dyes used in the rubber and textile industries.
Aniline dyes, readily available in regional markets, usually are the source for bright colors, but natural dyestuffs are used and even enjoying a comeback, especially among purists intent on producing textiles that have the look and feel of bygone days.
Hamilton) contain useful insights, but the essay I enjoyed most was Alison Victoria Matthews's well-informed and engaging study of the `politics of pigment in Victorian art, criticism and fashion', which explains how the impact of vivid and affordable aniline dyes on late Victorian culture induce a fashion change from bright to subdued `aesthetic' colour.