angiotensin-converting enzyme

(redirected from angiotensin converting enzyme)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms.
Related to angiotensin converting enzyme: sarcoidosis, Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors

angiotensin

 (ACE) [an″je-o-ten´sin]
a vasoconstrictive substance formed in the blood when renin is released from the juxtaglomerular apparatus in the kidney. The enzymatic action of renin acts on angiotensinogen to form the decapeptide angiotensin I, which is relatively inactive. It in turn is acted upon by peptidases (converting enzymes), chiefly in the lungs, to form the octapeptide angiotensin II, a powerful vasopressor and a stimulator of aldosterone secretion by the adrenal cortex. By its vasopressor action, it raises blood pressure and diminishes fluid loss in the kidney by restricting blood flow. Angiotensin II is hydrolyzed in various tissues to form heptapeptide angiotensin III, which has less vasopressor activity but more effect on the adrenal cortex.
angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) an enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes cleavage of a dipeptide from the C-terminal end of angiotensin I to form activated angiotensin II; called also peptidyl-dipeptidase A.
angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors competitive inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme, which converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and inactivates bradykinin. ACE inhibitors, such as captopril, are antagonists of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and potentiators of the kinin system and are used for treatment of hypertension, usually in conjunction with a diuretic. They are also used as vasodilators in the treatment of congestive heart failure.

an·gi·o·ten·sin-con·vert·ing en·zyme (ACE),

A zinc-containing hydrolase cleaving C-terminal dipeptides from a variety of substrates, including angiotensin I, which is converted to angiotensin II and histidylleucine (an important step in the metabolism of certain vasopressor agents). Drugs that inhibit it are used to treat hypertension and congestive heart failure.

angiotensin-converting enzyme

Peptidyl-dipeptidase A is the name recommended by the IUBMB for this enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1), though it is more popularly known as angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE).

angiotensin-converting enzyme

A key enzyme in the RAA system, which converts the inactive decapeptide angiotensin I to the octapeptide, angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor that also stimulates aldosterone secretion; ACE is also involved in metabolizing bradykinin Ref range 18–67 U/L, > age 20; those < 20 have higher levels; ACE is ↑ in sarcoidosis, Gaucher disease, leprosy, histoplasmosis, cirrhosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, DM, Hodgkin's disease, hyperthyroidism, amyloidosis, PBC, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, PE, scleroderma, silicosis, TB; ACE ↓ in response to prednisone therapy for sarcoidosis. See Renin/angiotensin/aldosterone system.

an·gi·o·ten·sin-con·vert·ing en·zyme

(ACE) (an'jē-ō-ten'sin-kŏn-vĕrt'ing en'zīm)
A hydrolase responsible for the conversion of angiotensin I to the vasoactive angiotensin II by removal of a dipeptide (histidylleucine) from angiotensin I. Drugs that inhibit ACE are used to treat hypertension and congestive heart failure.

angiotensin-converting enzyme

The (ACE) enzyme that converts angiotensin I to the active form angiotensin II. The gene for this enzyme has two alleles, the I allele and the D allele. Research has shown that the I allele is associated with significantly better physical performance, endurance and response to physical training than the D allele. The difference is especially marked if the I allele is present at both loci and compared with people with the D allele at both loci.
References in periodicals archive ?
The role of enzyme and substrate concentration in the evaluation of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition by enalaprilat in vitro.
Angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion-deletion polymorphism is associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
Angiotensinogen and angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphisms and the risk of bipolar affective disorder in humans.
Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition by means of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may significantly affect renal hemodynamic conditions and effective renal plasma flow in patients with diffuse renal parenchymal disease and in individuals with essential hypertension, and the extent of the hemodynamic changes depends also on the functional status of the kidney.
Many clinical drugs that against cardiovascular diseases have exhibited antioxidant effects; these drugs simultaneously inhibit endothelial adhesion molecule expression, such as aspirin, probucol, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma ligands, calcium channel blockers, beta-adrenergic blockers, etc.
Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme that converts inactive angiotensin I into a vasoactive and aldosterone-stimulating peptide angiotensin II.
Current National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) guidelines call for the use of a diuretic and, if needed, another class of hypertension drugs, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, see Drug Watch), beta blockers, or calcium channel blockers.
One of such genetic factors affecting response to training is angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism which has been widely studied [3,4].
Among specific topics are anti-glaucoma carbonic anhydrase inhibitors as opthalmologic drugs, crystallographic studies of carbonic anydrases from fungal pathogens for structure-assisted drug development, sulfonylated matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, Clostridium histolyticum collagenase inhibitors in the drug design, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and inhibitors of histidinol dehydrogenases as antibacterial agents.
Among the mechanisms of increase in PAR the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme has been reported to be increased in pulmonary arteries of PAH patients (2, 3) with a functional predominance at the site of arteriolar remodeling (4).
Patients taking two forms of medications targeting the angiotensin system, ARBs and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, had a 55 percent lower risk of dementia.

Full browser ?