angiotensin II receptor blocker


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angiotensin II receptor blocker

a drug that binds with angiotensin receptors, preventing endogenous angiotensin II from acting on them and thus reducing the vasoconstriction and sodium retention usually induced by that agonist.

The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system regulates blood pressure and electrolyte balance. Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor and neurotransmitter that raises peripheral vascular resistance, induces aldosterone secretion by the adrenal cortices and hence sodium retention, and promotes endothelial dysfunction and the growth and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle. Because angiotensin II plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension, congestive heart failure, and diabetic nephropathy, drugs that block its production or action are useful in these and other disorders. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in current use are nonpeptides that selectively inhibit the AT1 receptor. In essential hypertension, ARBs have the potential for achieving broader control than angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors because angiotensin II is generated in tissues, particularly diseased tissues, by enzymes besides ACE. ARBs have been shown to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), to reverse LVH in such patients, and slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy in those with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. ARBs are safe and well tolerated. Unlike ACE inhibitors, they do not inhibit the degradation of bradykinin and hence do not cause cough as a side-effect. Currently, they are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration only for the treatment of hypertension and, in those intolerant of ACE inhibitors, of heart failure. The generic names of angiotensin II receptor blockers end in -sartan, which is derived from the phrase selective angiotensin receptor antagonist.

angiotensin II receptor blocker

n. Abbr. ARB
Any of a class of drugs that reduce peripheral vascular resistance by inhibiting the action of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, used in the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and other cardiovascular disorders. Also called angiotensin receptor blocker, angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

an·gi·o·ten·sin II re·cep·tor block·er

(ARB) (an'jē-ō-ten'sin rĕ-sep'tŏr blok'ĕr)
A drug that binds with angiotensin receptors, preventing endogenous angiotensin II from acting on them and thus reducing the vasoconstriction and sodium retention usually induced by that agonist; used to treat hypertension.
References in periodicals archive ?
ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers can cause dizziness, lightheadedness and faintness, especially when taken with a diuretic.
Discovered by Takeda, azilsartan is a potent and lasting angiotensin II receptor blocker ("ARB") that lowers blood pressure by inhibiting the action of angiotensin II, a vasopressor hormone.
EDARBI is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) that lowers blood pressure by blocking the action of angiotensin II, a vasopressor hormone that constricts blood vessels.
In BEAUTIFUL, 10,917 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a left ventricular ejection fraction below 40% were randomized in double-blind fashion to ivabradine at a target dose of 7.5 mg twice daily, or placebo, on top of standard evidence-based background medications, including [beta]-blockers in 87% and an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker in 90%.
MicardisA is an angiotensin II receptor blocker indicated for the treatment of hypertension, to lower blood pressure and cardiovascular risk reduction in patients unable to take ACE inhibitors.
20 October 2010 - Japan-based pharmaceutical company Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TYO: 4502) today announced that Takeda Global Research &Development Centre (Europe) has submitted a Marketing Authorisation Application (MAA) to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), for azilsartan medoxomil (development code: TAK-491), an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) for the treatment of essential hypertension.
It is indicated for the treatment of hypertension in patients whose blood pressure has not been adequately controlled with a calcium channel blocker or angiotensin II receptor blocker alone.
A fixed-dose combination formulation of the calcium channel blocker and the angiotensin II receptor blocker for use in the treatment of hypertension, alone or with other antihypertensive drugs.
Bigazzi and his associates evaluated 68 patients treated with an ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) alone (group 1), 68 patients treated with a combination of ACE inhibitors and ARBs (group 2); and 68 patients who received a statin and spironolactone 25 mg/day in addition to ACE inhibitors and ARBs (group 3).
Theoretical considerations suggest that an ACE inhibitor along with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) should also work, but studies have not shown enhanced blood pressure reduction, although the combination does result in significant reduction in proteinuria.
Most nondiabetologists will probably be surprised to learn that it's an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), according to American Diabetes Association's treatment guidelines.
Furthermore, what is the value of doing annual microevaluations in a diabetic who is already on an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker, or if that patient has already once demonstrated the condition?

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