angiomyolipoma


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angiomyolipoma

 [an″je-o-mi″o-lĭ-po´mah]
a benign tumor containing vascular, adipose, and muscle elements, occurring most often in the kidney with smooth muscle elements.

an·gi·o·my·o·li·po·ma

(an'jē-ō-mī'ō-li-pō'mă),
A benign neoplasm of adipose tissue (lipoma) in which muscle cells and vascular structures are fairly conspicuous; most commonly a renal tumor containing smooth muscle, often associated with tuberous sclerosis.
[angio- + G. mys, muscle, + lipos, fat, + -oma, tumor]

angiomyolipoma

(ăn′jē-ō-mī′ō-lĭ-pō′mə)
n.
A benign tumor composed of adipose tissue, muscle cells, and vascular structures.

angiomyolipoma

A benign, well-circumscribed, nonencapsulated tumour-like lesion or hamartoma (perivascular epithelioid cell tumour—PEComa), which is the most common mesenchymal lesion of the kidney. It is composed of blood vessels, smooth muscle and mature fat, and is typically seen in the kidney or paranephric tissue. Angiomyolipoma also occurs in the fallopian tube, liver, nasal cavity, penis, skin, spermatic cord and vagina, and can mimic renal cell carcinoma. Up to 50% of patients have tuberous sclerosis (TS); 75% of TS patients have angiomyolipomas.

Clinical findings
May cause catastrophic bleeds.
 
Molecular pathology
TSC1 and TSC2 mutations.

an·gi·o·my·o·li·po·ma

(an'jē-ō-mī'ō-li-pō'mă)
A benign neoplasm of adipose tissue (lipoma) in which muscle cells and vascular structures are fairly conspicuous.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Angiomyolipoma, rhabdomyoma, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, tuberosclerosis, tumor
Increasing severity of haematuria with successive pregnancies in a woman with renal angiomyolipoma. International Urology and Nephrology, 39(2), 409-412.
CT evaluation of spontaneously ruptured renal angiomyolipomas with massive hemorrhage spreading into multi-retroperitoneal fascia and fascial spaces.
The current recommendations (Table 1) suggest MRI of the abdomen at the time of diagnosis of TSC and every 1-3 years throughout the lifetime of the patient [5] to diagnose polycystic disease, renal cell carcinoma or other tumours, and to monitor changes in angiomyolipoma. Annual clinical assessments of renal function and hypertension are also recommended.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for two clinical manifestations of TSC disease: treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs), non-cancerous brain tumors, and renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs), noncancerous kidney tumors.
Angiomyolipoma of the kidney: the experience at the University Hospital of the West Indies.
1) had morphologic features of solid and cystic eosinophilic tumor, with papillary formation and focal areas of discohesive polygonal cells reminiscent of epithelioid angiomyolipoma (Figure 4, C and D).
Extrarenal retroperitoneal angiomyolipoma: description of a case and review of the literature.
Differential diagnoses include papillary renal cell carcinoma, glomus tumor, hemangiopericytoma, collecting duct carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma, renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma, and Wilms tumor.
The incidence is approximately 1 in 5000-10,000 births.[2] The presence of common manifestations include cortical or subependymal tubers, white matter abnormalities, cardiac rhabdomyoma, renal angiomyolipoma, and skin lesions.