angiomatoid

an·gi·o·ma·toid

(an'jē-ō'mă-toyd),
Resembling a tumor of vascular origin.

angiomatoid

adjective Referring to an angioma-like appearance.

an·gi·o·ma·toid

(an'jē-ō'mă-toyd)
Resembling a tumor of vascular origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aneurysmal FH is distinguished from angiomatoid FH by its deep location, fibrous and lymphoid cuff at the periphery, and desmin expression.
In the early 1990s, improvements in immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy led to classification into five subtypes: storiform-pleomorphic, myxoid, giant cell, inflammatory, and angiomatoid. (6) In 2002, the World Health Organization (WHO) adjusted this classification with more stringent criteria and replacement of MFH with UPS.
The differential diagnosis is fairly broad and includes phlegmon/abscess, nerve sheath tumor, synovial sarcoma, fibrous histiocytoma (benign, malignant and angiomatoid forms), angiosarcoma, and fibromatosis.
Therefore, the radiological diagnosis was sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation (SANT) of the spleen.
Due to the vast range of histological appearance at the MFH diagnosed tumors, they were further subdivided into (1) storiform-pleomorphic, (2) myxoid (myxofibrosarcoma), (3) giant cell, (4) inflammatory, and (5) angiomatoid [8].
Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation (SANT) of the spleen is a rare benign vascular lesion with unknown etiopathogenesis and with definite features of imaging, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry.
Definitive diagnosis of MAE is based on morphological and immunohistochemical findings that differentiate it from other vascular lesions of the spleen, including splenic hemangioma, lymphangioma, angiosarcoma, littoral cell angioma, hamartoma, and sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation (SANT) of the spleen.
When arterial branch dilatation affects a cluster of vessels, it is termed an angiomatoid lesion Grade V (hallmark Plexiform Plexus of lesion) proliferation capillary-like channels within a dilated arterial branch of the thick-walled parent artery that yields a glomoid appearance to the vessel + overlying thrombotic material Grade VI (rare) Vascular necrosis + Fibrinoid necrosis inflammation of smooth muscle in the vascular media + a necrotizing arteritis with either lymphocytes or neutrophils
Glomus tumors are classified into solid glomus tumors, glomangiomas, or glomangiomyomas according to the predominant histologic component present, that is, glomus cells, vascular spaces or blood vessels (angiomatoid), or smooth muscle fibers, respectively.
The different variants of MFH include storiform, pleomorphic, myxoid, inflammatory, giant cell and angiomatoid. MFH is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of late adult life .
ABH has to be differentiated from blood dyscrasias (thrombocytopenia, von Willebrand's disease, other coagulopathies and leukemia), immunobullous disorders (bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA disease, cicatricial pemphigoid, and dermatitis herpetiformis), angiomatoid lesions in Osler-Rendu-Weber syndrome.
Structural changes include medial hypertophy, intimal proliferation, fibrosis, luminal occlusion, angiomatoid changes and eventially fibrinoid necrosis.