angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma


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angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma

rare subtype of lymphoma characterized by generalized lymphadenopathy, prominent systemic symptoms, fever, weight loss, skin rash, polyclonal gammopathy, circulating immune complexes and autoantibodies, and a tendency to infection complication. Previously referred to as angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy with dysproteinemia (AILD). Diagnosis is often difficult because of the varying clinicopathologic picture. Fewer than one third of the patients can be expected to have long-term remissions even after multiagent chemotherapy. Complete remissions have been reported after the use of interferon-α and cyclosporine.

angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma

A lymphoma affecting the elderly characterised by generalised lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms.
 
DiffDx
Drug reaction (e.g., antibiotics, phenytoin), T-cell-rich diffuse large B cell lymphoma, classical Hodgkin lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy with dysproteinaemia, peripheral T-cell lymphoma (undifferentiated).
References in periodicals archive ?
Lymphocytic variant hypereosinophilic syndrome progressing to angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
Histologic evolution of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma in consecutive biopsies: clinical correlation and insights into natural history and disease progression.
A snapshot of the global therapeutic scenario for Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma (AILT)/Immunoblastic Lymphadenopathy.
60,61) Some have suggested that at least a subset of cases of PCFHTCL share overlapping features with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma represents 16% of T-cell lymphomas in North America and is an important differential diagnosis of ATLL, considering both can have hypercalcemia, diffuse lymphadenopathy, and skin involvement.
Molecular signatures to improve diagnosis in peripheral T-cell lymphoma and prognostication in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
Survival rates were 40% for angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, 50% for follicular lymphoma, 67% for large B-cell lymphoma, and 100% for Burkitt lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, and small B-cell lymphoma, unclassified.
Forty-five patients were enrolled, including 42 with Hodgkin lymphoma, two with systemic ALCL and one with CD30-positive angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
Other lymphomas can also express these antigens, including some lymphoblastic lymphomas and some T-cell lymphomas, such as angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
Forty-four patients were evaluable for response, including 41 with Hodgkin lymphoma, two with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and one with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
Data from 45 patients treated on the single-arm, dose-escalation study of SGN-35 were presented, including 42 with Hodgkin lymphoma, two with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and one with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.