angiographic restenosis

angiographic restenosis

A term of art used in interventional cardiology for greater than 50%-diameter stenosis at follow-up of a previously treated artery.
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Angiographic restenosis 6 months after PCI was reduced 10% in the DXM group (30%) compared to the placebo group (40%; P = 0.571).
Along with this occurrence of angiographic restenosis and target vessel revascularization rates were recorded after 3 months of angiographic followup.
Secondary end points included: (1) procedural success rate, defined as successful PCI without associated in-hospital major clinical complications; (2) angina symptoms at one-year; (3) stent thrombosis, defined as definite stent thrombosis occurring when clinical presentation was consistent with ACS and angiography examination confirmed stent occlusion or thrombus; and (4) rate of in-stent restenosis (ISR), defined as > 50.0% angiographic restenosis on follow-up within one-year resulting in either repeat-PCI or CABG.
Bifurcation lesions are among the most frequently approached and challenging coronary lesions for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).[sup][1] However, treatment of these lesions is still limited by low rates of procedural success and high rates of clinical and angiographic restenosis.
The explanation for this dissociation between smoking and angiographic restenosis is that smokers have a reduced sensitivity to restenosis, and smokers are more reluctant to seek medical attention despite recurrent angina.34 In the present study, our results also failed to show that smoking was associated with ISR risk, regardless of BMS or DES implantation, which was similar to some previous reports.
One month follow-up C-reactive protein may be a useful predictor of angiographic restenosis and long-term clinical outcomes after bare metal stent implantation.
The rate of angiographic restenosis was found to be 10.5% since it is not drug-coated.
Dawkins, M.D., global chief medical officer for Boston Scientific." Clinical data from the Horizons-AMI trial showed that, in patients with AMI, paclitaxel-eluting stents were superior in efficacy to bare-metal stents, significantly reducing clinical and angiographic restenosis compared to bare-metal stents, while demonstrating a comparable safety profile at three years.
Stone, a professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, has revealed that in patients undergoing angioplasty, the use of paclitaxel-eluting stents has been found to reduce rates of target lesion revascularization (TLR) and binary angiographic restenosis when compared to the use of bare-metal stents after 1 year.
The rate of binary angiographic restenosis at 6 months after treatment was 20% in the sirolimus-eluting stent group and 30% in the brachytherapy group; the difference just missed statistical significance.
The results from this trial surpassed expectations, demonstrating virtual elimination of neointimal in-stent proliferation with no measurable late loss (-0.01mm), a binary angiographic restenosis rate of 0%, and no acute or late stent thrombosis.
A repeat angiographic study was performed after for detection of angiographic restenosis at 6 months, and [greater than or equal to] 50% diameter stenosis at the site of intervention was considered indicative of restenosis.