angiographic


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Related to angiographic: angiography, angiographic catheter

an·gi·o·graph·ic

(an'jē-ō-graf'ik),
Relating to or using angiography.

an·gi·o·graph·ic

(an'jē-ō-graf'ik)
Relating to or using angiography.

angiography

(an″jē-og′ră-fē) [ angio- + -graphy]
1. A description of blood vessels and lymphatics.
2. Diagnostic or therapeutic radiography of the heart and blood vessels with a radiopaque contrast medium. Types include magnetic resonance angiography, interventional radiology, and computed tomography.

Patient care

Before the procedure: health care professionals explain to the patient how a needle or catheter will be used to penetrate a blood vessel, and that a contrast agent will be injected into it to highlight the course of the vessel (map the vessel) and any abnormalities in it or associated with it. These abnormalities may include widenings and weaknesses in the blood vessels (aneurysms); narrowings of the vessel (stenoses or obstructions); abnormal connections between arteries and veins (fistulae); or unusual networks of vessels (arteriovenous malformations or in some cases, the complex blood supply of malignant tumors). Complications of angiography include damage to the blood vessel or neighboring tissues, bleeding or bruising, cardiac arrhythmias, syncope, infection, or, in very rare instances, death. These potential complications should be fully reviewed with the patient during the informed consent that precedes the procedure.

During the procedure: the patient’s heart rate and rhythm are closely monitored, along with his or her blood pressure, oxygenation, mental status, and in critically ill patients, urinary output. The patient may experience a hot flush during the injection of contrast, palpitations, or other unusual sensations. These sensations should be explained to the patient before they occur to minimize anxiety. Anxiolytics or sedatives may sometimes be administered to patients as needed.

After the procedure: the puncture site is tamponaded and bandaged and then monitored for signs of bleeding or bruising. The part of the body distal to the puncture site is periodically assessed for pulse, color, warmth, sensation, and movement. The patient is permitted to mobilize only after the puncture site is stabilized and institutional protocols are completed.

3. Recording of arterial pulse movements with a sphygmograph. angiographic (-ŏ-graf′ik), adjectiveangiographically

aortic angiography

Angiography of the aorta and its branches.

cardiac angiography

Angiography of the heart and coronary arteries.

catheter angiography

Angiography performed after a small tube is placed in a blood vessel and a contrast medium is injected to outline the internal structure of the blood vessel.

cerebral angiography

Angiography of the vascular system of the brain.
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CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY: A. tight stenosis; B. artery reopened with a stent
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CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY: A. tight stenosis; B. artery reopened with a stent

coronary angiography

Angiography of the coronary arteries to determine any pathological obstructions to blood flow to the heart muscle. It is used to provide definitive images of the coronary arteries that reveal atherosclerotic blockage to blood flow so that those blockages can be surgically bypassed, opened (with angioplasty or stenting, for example), or treated with medications.

CAUTION!

Potential hazards of the procedure include coronary artery dissection, kidney failure resulting from exposure to angiographic contrast, and radiation exposure.
See: illustration

CT pulmonary angiography

The best contemporary test to assess a patient suspected of having a pulmonary embolism The test uses computed tomographic imaging of the pulmonary arteries to identify blood clots in the right ventricular outflow tracts or the pulmonary arteries. The presence of a clot indicates the need for treatment with anticoagulant drugs. It is used as the generally preferred alternative to invasive pulmonary angiography (which, while accurate, requires right ventricular catheterization), or to ventilation/perfusion scanning of the lungs (which often yields indeterminate results).

CAUTION!

Potential hazards of the test include its radiation exposure, its risk for renal failure (esp. in patients with predisposing conditions for kidney injury), and the risk of allergy to the radiological contrast agent used in the test.

digital subtraction angiography

Use of a computer to investigate arterial blood circulation. A reference image is obtained by fluoroscopy. Then a contrast medium is injected intravenously. Another image is produced from the fluoroscopic image, after which the computer technique subtracts the image produced by surrounding tissues. The third image is an enhanced view of the arteries.
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INTRAVENOUS FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAM

intravenous fluorescein angiography

Abbreviation: IVFA
The optimal diagnostic test to evaluate the vascular status of the retina and choroid. Fluorescein dye is injected into an arm vein and sequential photographs are taken of the fundus as the dye circulates at different time intervals.
See: illustration

magnetic resonance angiography

Abbreviation: MRA
Noninvasive imaging of blood vessels by magnetic resonance imaging. The technique does not expose patients to ionizing radiation and avoids catheterization of the vessels. It has been used to study aneurysms, blockages, and other diseases of the carotid, coronary, femoral, iliac, and renal arteries. Studies may be done with or without contrast agents.

PHI-motion angiography

A laser imaging test to identify abnormal blood vessels in the choroidal layer beneath the retina. These abnormal vessels may leak, causing central visual field loss in age-related macular degeneration.

pulmonary angiography

Angiography of the pulmonary vessels (e.g., in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism).

selective angiography

Angiography in which a catheter is introduced directly into the vessel to be visualized.
References in periodicals archive ?
The comparison of the two groups was done on the basis of their gender, presence of co-morbids such as diabetes and hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, family history of ischemic heart disease, smoking, and angiographic characteristic of coronary artery disease.
According to follow-up angiography grading, CAD patients were categorized into the low-score group (angiographic grade 0 or 1, n = 12) and high-score group (angiographic grade 2 or 3, n = 18).
Therefore, the choice of medical treatment, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is largely dictated by the clinical presentation and the degree of compromise to coronary flow on angiographic study.
the vast majority of pMI had an identifiable angiographic complication and only 21% of the peri-PCI MI did not have an identifiable cause.
The Beacon Tip Angiographic Catheters have been found to exhibit tip splitting or separation, which has resulted in 42 Medical Device Reports.
Twelve patients showed progressive thrombosis of their aneurysms, so further intervention was not deemed necessary; 6 patients had residual necks that were thought to be stable compared with their original angiographic picture, and 3 patients developed more residual filling of the aneurysm, in 2 cases to less than 90% so the aneurysm had to be recoiled.
This multi-center, prospective trial will assess the safety and effectiveness of the Genous Bio-engineered R stent in conjunction with optimal statin therapy and will include angiographic follow up at six and 18 months.
And there have been no prior studies at all relating fish intake to angiographic measurement of coronary luminal narrowing in postmenopausal women with established coronary disease, according to Dr.
(3) Compression of the external carotid artery in patients with similar clinical findings has also been seen on angiographic imaging.
"If you just do angiographic studies [to map the progressive deposition of arterial plaque], it might take only two years."