angiofibroma

angiofibroma

 [an″je-o-fi-bro´mah]
an angioma containing fibrous tissue.
juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma a benign tumor of the nasopharynx composed of fibrous connective tissue with abundant endothelium-lined vascular spaces, usually occurring during puberty in boys. Nasal obstruction may become total, with adenoid-type speech, discomfort in swallowing, obstruction of the eustachian tube, and epistaxis.

an·gi·o·fi·bro·ma

(an'jē-ō-fī-brō'mă),
A benign but locally invasive neoplasm composed of dense fibrous tissue and thin-walled vascular spaces.

angiofibroma

A benign nasopharyngeal tumour which is most common in adolescent and young adult males.

Clinical findings
Repeated epistaxis, nasal congestion and discharge, hearing loss.

Imaging
Skull film, CT of head.
 
Management
Excision if lesion is enlarging or blocking airway.

angiofibroma

Juvenile angiofibroma ENT A benign nasopharyngeal tumor which is most common in adolescent/adult ♂ Clinical Repeated epistaxis, nasal congestion and discharge, hearing loss Imaging Skull film, CT of head Management Excision if lesion is enlarging or blocking airway

tel·an·gi·ec·tat·ic fi·bro·ma

(tel-an'jē-ek-tat'ik fī-brō'mă)
A benign tumor of fibrous tissue in which there are numerous small and large, frequently dilated vascular channels.
Synonym(s): angiofibroma.
References in periodicals archive ?
The appearance is very similar to an angiofibroma (fibrous papule).
In our study majority of cases were of Squamous cell carcinoma constituting 67.9% cases, Haemangioma 5.8% cases, chronic tonsillitis 4.8% cases, chronic inflammation 1.9% cases, squamous papilloma 2.9% cases, verrucous carcinoma, fibrolipoma, ameloblastic carcinoma, epulis and lichen planus constituting 1.9% cases each respectively and pleomorphic adenoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, lymphangioma, basal cell carcinoma, angiofibroma, fibrous histiocytoma and NHL constituting 0.9% cases each respectively.
She presented with multiple angiofibroma on the left side of the face and in the back (Figure la, b) with bone cysts in phalanxes, which were indicative of tuberous sclerosis with normal neurologic findings.
(6,7) During puberty, the gestational hormones can lead to rapid growth of the lesion and with increased symptoms, as in our case; however, hemangiomas are often confused with more aggressive lesions such as angiofibroma and hemangiopericytomas, which are more common in young boys and in pregnancy, respectively.
Angiofibroma, or fibrous papule, is a commonly seen, benign, skin-colored papule also often occurring on the nose.
In the differential diagnosis of benign masses in tonsils, the following should be considered: juvenile angiofibroma, fibroepithelial polyp, arteriovenous malformation, lymphangiectasia, squamous papilloma, hamartoma, inclusion cyst, lipoma, and fibroma (6, 7).
Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the polyps typically have intermediate-to-low T1-weighted and high T2-weighted signal intensities due to their high-water and low-protein contents.[10] Besides a CP, the differential diagnosis of a unilateral nasal mass includes benign neoplasm, such as inverted papilloma and juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, and malignancy.[4] Detection of the site of origin is very important because surgical removal of the polyp with the mucosa of its pedicle attachment is required to prevent recurrence.
mucocoele, nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, osteoma, lymphangioma, haemangioma, pituitary tumours, internal carotid artery aneurysm, fibrodysplasia) and malignant sphenoid lesions (although they have not yet been reported in this age group, but considerations would be lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewings sarcoma).
This disease exhibits a triad known as the Vogt triad, the full triad that includes seizures, mental retardation, and cutaneous angiofibroma occuring in only 30% of reported cases.
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign tumour originating in the nasopharynx, presenting in adolescent males with nasal mass, epistaxis, nasal obstruction, cheek swelling, and proptosis.
Telangiectasia should be excluded if the patient has a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and angiofibroma should be considered in the differential diagnosis if the patient is a male adolescent [1].
AMFB is morphologically similar to other invasive mesenchymal cell tumours such as aggressive angiomyxoma (AAM) and cellular angiofibroma and they share many overlapping immunohistochemical and structural features [9,10].