angiodysplasia


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angiodysplasia

 [an″je-o-dis-pla´zhah]
small vascular abnormalities, such as of the intestinal tract.

an·gi·o·dys·pla·si·a

(an'jē-ō-dis-plā'zē-ă),
Degenerative or congenital structural abnormality of the normally distributed vasculature.

angiodysplasia

A degenerative lesion of previously healthy blood vessels, found most commonly in the caecum and proximal ascending colon and characterised by vascular ectasias usually affecting those above age 60. Angiodysplasia increases with age, accounts for 40% of the cases of recurrent or chronic lower GI bleeding in the elderly, and is associated with diverticula and aortic stenosis

angiodysplasia

Colonic angiodysplasia Gastroenterology An abnormal aggregate of blood vessels–vascular ectasias usually in the right colon in persons > age 60; angiodysplasia accounts for 40% of the cases of recurrent or chronic lower GI bleeding in the elderly

an·gi·o·dys·pla·sia

(an'jē-ō-dis-plā'zē-ă)
Degenerative or congenital structural abnormality of the normally distributed vasculature.

angiodysplasia

Abnormal blood vessel formation. Angiodysplasia of the intestinal lining is one of the causes of bleeding into the bowel.
References in periodicals archive ?
Angiodysplasia and NSAID-induced small bowel lesions are the most common etiologies in patients 40 years old or older.
Non-CD patients 189 Normal 79 (41.8%) Angiodysplasia 63 (33.3%) Celiac disease 4 (2.1%) Mass lesions 6 (3.2%) Nonspecific changes 31 (16.4%) Angiodysplasia/Polyp 5 (2.6%) Angiodysplasia/Celiac 1 (0.5%) Capsule retention 1 (0.5%) Incomplete study 5 (2.6%) (2 due to gastroparesis) Other complications 0 CD: Crohn's disease.
had noted that PHE included mucosal inflammatory changes such as edema, erythema, granularity, friability, and spontaneous bleeding as well as vascular lesions such as cherry red spots, telangiectasias, angiodysplasia, and varices [6].
angiodysplasia. It is characterized by limb hypertrophy caused by venous and rarely arterial malformations and skeletal hypoplasia [28, 29].
Cardiac diseases may favor GIB through various mechanisms: ischemia, emboli formation, or through association with a vascular lesion with bleeding potential, such as aortic stenosis and angiodysplasia, infectious endocarditis--mycotic aneurysm, Marfan syndrome--dissecting aneurysm.
The differential diagnosis may include some benign and malignant gastric neoplasms, such as nonneoplastic gastric polyps; some other soft tissue tumors with lipomatous components/differentiation, such as lipoma, angiomyolipoma, and well-differentiated liposarcoma; and vascular lesions, such as angiodysplasia and glomus tumors.
There are many possible causes of GI hemorrhage, which include esophageal varices, peptic ulcer, gastritis, polyps, angiodysplasia, diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hemorrhoids, anal fissure, and cancer (1).
Vascular lesions of the gastrointestinal tract include hemangioma, telangiectasia, angiodysplasia and phlebectasia (1) and they account for 5-10% of all benign neoplasms of the small bowel.
The incidence of LGIB ranges from 20.5 to 27 cases per 100,000 in adults in the US [2, 3] and increases markedly with age, reflecting underlying diseases such as diverticular disease, angiodysplasia, colitis, and neoplasia [2-4].
Several studies have demonstrated that vascular damage occurs throughout the intestinal tract and that mucosal abnormalities (including watermelon stomach, intestinal telangiectasias, and angiodysplasia) may be present in more than 50% of SSc patients and are usually associated with a more pronounced vasculopathic phenotype (i.e., digital ulcers and pulmonary artery hypertension) [34].
Prucalopride Control (n = 29) (n = 25) All positive findings 22 11 Angiodysplasia 12 4 Ulcer/erosions 4 3 Fresh blood 6 2 Mass 0 2
The patient's past medical history included a severe hypertensive and valvular heart disease, chronic kidney failure, right carotid stenosis, hiatal hernia, colon angiodysplasia, and a Raynaud's syndrome.