anetoderma

anetoderma

 [an″ĕ-to-der´mah]
localized elastolysis producing circumscribed areas of soft, thin, wrinkled skin that often protrude as small outpouchings. It may be a primary condition or it may be secondary to some other condition involving the skin, such as syphilis, leprosy, or tuberculosis.

an·e·to·der·ma

(an-ĕ-tō-der'mă),
Atrophoderma in which the skin becomes baglike and wrinkled or depressed, with loss of dermal elasticity.
[G. anetos, relaxed, + derma, skin]

anetoderma

/an·e·to·der·ma/ (an″ĕ-to-der´mah) localized elastolysis producing circumscribed areas of soft, thin, wrinkled skin that often protrude in small outpouchings.
perifollicular anetoderma  anetoderma occurring around hair follicles not preceded by folliculitis; it may be caused by elastase-producing staphylococci, by drugs, or by endocrine factors.
postinflammatory anetoderma  a condition occurring usually during infancy, marked by the development of erythematous papules that enlarge to form plaques, followed by laxity of the skin resembling cutis laxa.

anetoderma

[an′ətōdur′mə]
Etymology: Gk, anetos, relaxed, derma, skin
an idiopathic clinical change produced by focal damage to elastin fibers that results in looseness of the skin. There is no known effective treatment.
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Anetoderma

an·e·to·der·ma

(an'ĕ-tō-dĕr'mă)
Atrophoderma in which the skin becomes baglike and wrinkled.
[G. anetos, relaxed, + derma, skin]

anetoderma

looseness and atrophy of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The differential diagnoses mainly include anetoderma, mid-dermal elastolysis, focal dermal hypoplasia, lupus panniculitis, and localized scleroderma.
The clinical differential diagnosis includes aplasia cutis, anetoderma and atrophoderma, and atrophic DFSP.
Connective tissue diseases: pseudoxanthoma elasticum, anetoderma, and Ehlers--Danlos syndrome in pregnancy.
There are also publications that state that the bullous appearance forms secondary to anetoderma.
Shames BS, Nassif A, Bailey CS, Saltzstein SL: Secondary anetoderma involving a pilomatricoma.
Primary anetoderma is characterized by atrophic macules or patches that may bulge like pouches.
APA-associated cardiac valve disease APA-associated livedo reticularis APA-associated nephropathy APA-associated thrombocytopenia Other skin manifestions Ulcerations, pseudo-vasculitic lesions, digital gangrene, superficial phlebitis, malignant atrophic papulosis-like lesions, subungual splinter hemorrhages, and anetoderma (a circumscribed area of loss of dermal elastic tissue) Other neurological manifestations Cognitive dysfunction, chorea, headache or migraine, multiple sclerosis, transverse myelopathy, and epilepsy Table 4.
One unusual physical consequence of underdeveloped skin is anetoderma of prematurity, characterized by tissue paper-like depressed brown scars or outpouchings of skin.
Morphometric analysis of elastic skin fibers from patients with cutis laxa, anetoderma, pseudoxanthoma elasticum and Buschke-Ollendorff and Williams Beuren syndromes.
The dermatologic conditions included livedo reticularis, skin ulcerations, pseudovasculitis lesions, superficial skin necrosis, digital gangrenes, superficial phlebitis, multiple subungual splinter hemorrhages, and anetoderma.
No patient appeared with anetoderma, but four developed it during follow-up.