aneroid


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an·er·oid

(an'er-oyd),
Without fluid; denoting a form of barometer without mercury, in which the varying air pressure is indicated by a pointer governed by the movement of the elastic wall of an evacuated chamber. Also used to denote a mercury-free pressure gauge used with some sphygmomanometers.
[G. a- priv. + nēros, wet, + eidos, form]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aneroid

adjective Without liquid; fluidless.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·er·oid

(an'ĕr-oyd)
Not containing liquid (e.g., a sphygmomanometer that does not contain a column of liquid mercury).
[G. a- priv. + nēros, wet, + eidos, form]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

an·er·oid

(an'ĕr-oyd)
Without fluid.
[G. a- priv. + nēros, wet, + eidos, form]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The nurses that measured BP either by aneroid sphygmomanometers or oscillometric devices were blinded to the values measured by the invasive technique, as they were recorded one second before the nurse started the inflation of the cuff.
In order to minimize measurement error, the equipment to be used, whether aneroid, electronic, or mercury, should be regularly inspected and calibrated.
n A digital monitor is easier to use than the aneroid unit.
Historically, the most familiar indirect method of BP measurement is the use of the mercury or aneroid sphygmomanometer and a stethoscope using the upper arm (Genc, Altunkan, Kilinc, & Altunkan, 2008; Netea et al., 2003a; Netea & Thien, 2004; Pickering et al., 2005).
Patients looking to do home monitoring of their blood pressure have a variety of options, ranging from an array of low-pace aneroid monitors to a series of sophisticated digital devices such as the recently launched UA-851ANT blood pressure monitor from A&D Medical.
At most pharmacies that sell blood pressure monitors, you can select between aneroid or digital models that take your pressure at the arm or wrist.
A Several devices are available that measure blood pressure in your upper arm, wrist or finger, including older mercury and aneroid sphygmomanometers and newer digital monitors.
It's also the best base camp for a non-technical climb of Aneroid Mountain, Oregon's ninth tallest peak.