anergy


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anergy

 [an´er-je]
1. lack of energy; extreme passivity.
2. diminished reactivity to specific antigen(s). adj., adj aner´gic.

an·er·gy

(an'er-jē),
1. In a person, absence of the ability to generate a sensitivity reaction to substances expected to be antigenic (immunogenic, allergenic).
2. Lack of energy.
[G. an- priv. + energeia, energy, from ergon, work]

anergy

/an·er·gy/ (an´er-je)
1. extreme lack of energy.
2. diminished reactivity to one or more specific antigens.aner´gic

anergy

[an′ərjē]
Etymology: Gk, a, ergon, not work
1 lack of activity, lack of energy leading to inactivity.
2 an immunodeficient condition characterized by a lack of or diminished reaction to an antigen or group of antigens. This state may be seen in advanced tuberculosis and other serious infections, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and some malignancies. anergic, adj.

anergy

Depression or absence of an immune response to an antigen to which a host was previously sensitive. Anergy is characterised by decreased or absent lymphokine secretion by viable T cells when the T cell receptor is engaged by an antigen; it can be tested by loss of delayed hypersensitivity (e.g., to PPD, Candida antigens or DCNB).

Anergy can be induced in mature and differentiated CD4+ T cells by exposure to complexes of antigen and appropriate (self) MHC in absence of certain uncharacterised co-stimulatory signals on the antigen-presenting cells. In patients who have received blood transfusions, anergy may be induced by presentation of antigen by “nonprofessional” antigen-presenting cells.

anergy

Immunology Depression or absence of an immune response to an antigen to which the host was previously sensitive; it is characterized by ↓/absent lymphokine secretion by viable T cells when the T cell receptor is engaged by an antigen; it can be tested by loss of delayed hypersensitivity–eg, to PPD, Candida antigens, or DCNB. See Clonal anergy, Deletion. Cf Allergy.

an·er·gy

(an'ĕr-jē)
1. Absence of ability to generate a sensitivity reaction in a subject to substances expected to be antigenic (immunogenic, allergenic) in that individual.
2. Lack of energy.
[G. an- priv. + energeia, energy, from ergon, work]

anergy

Specific immunological tolerance in which T cells and B cells fail to respond normally by producing an immune response to antigens. The state can be reversed.

anergy

loss or weakening of the immune response to an irritating agent or ANTIGEN. A T-CELL that encounters an antigen and does not respond to it is anergic. Contrasts with ALLERGY where there is an overreaction, rather than lack of reaction, to a substance.

an·er·gy

(an'ĕr-jē)
1. In a person, absence of the ability to generate a sensitivity reaction to substances expected to be antigenic (immunogenic, allergenic).
2. Lack of energy.
[G. an- priv. + energeia, energy, from ergon, work]

anergy (an´urjē),

n in terms of hypersensitivity, an inability to react to specific antigens (i.e., lack of reaction to intradermally injected antigens in measles, Hodgkin's sarcoma, and overwhelming tuberculosis).

anergy

diminished reactivity to specific antigen(s).
References in periodicals archive ?
Mitigation of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis by TGF-beta induced Foxp3+ regulatory T lymphocytes through the induction of anergy and infectious tolerance.
4 Table 2 Relationship between clinical manifestation of B12 deficit and geriatric syndromes Clinical manifestation of B12 deficit Geriatric syndrome Hematological: Megaloblastic anemia Anergy Pancytopenia Neurological: Sub-acute combined Dizziness, syncope degeneration of spine Polyneuropathies Falls Cerebral syndromes Frailty Optic neuropathy Functional decline Cerebrovascular disease Failure to thrive Gastrointestinal: Diarrhea Anorexia of aging Weight loss Cachexy Protein-energy malnutrition Skin and mucosa: Hunter's glossitis Mucocutaneous ulcers Angular cheilitis Cardiovascular: Atherosclerosis Dizziness Coronary disease Syncope (hyperhomocysteinemia) Venous thromboembolism Falls Psychiatric: Dementia Cognitive decline Falls Frailty
Intellectual mnestic difficulties, as well as asthenia and anergy are thought transient to be leveled down after termination of drug use and prolonged remission (Orudjev, 2002; Fishbein et al.
T-cell anergy can be seen within hours after brain damage while total circulating numbers of T-cells (T helper, T-supressors, NK, IL-2 receptor-bearing T-cells) are decreased (3).
The alignment is approached with the ultimate objective of creating synergy (1) and/or inhibiting anergy (2).
Induction of CTLA-4-mediated anergy contributes to persistent colonization in the murine model of gastric helicobacter pylori infection.
Zwitterionic polysaccharides stimulate T cells with no preferential V beta usage and promote anergy, resulting in protection against experimental abscess formation.
Minister Yildiz and Director-General of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Luis Echavarri spoke to reporters Wednesday after the nuclear energy conference hosted by Turkish Atomic Anergy Authority in Ankara.
Low-exergy" refers to using anergy and reducing exergy -- qualities and quantity of energy -- instead of fossil fuels.
CTLA-4 upregulation during HIV infection: Association with anergy and possible target for therapeutic intervention.
These mechanisms include relative T cell inactivity or T cell anergy [12, 13], T cell depletion by apoptosis [14, 15] and active immune suppression [16, 17].