anencephalic

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an·en·ce·phal·ic

(an'en-se-fal'ik),
Relating to meroanencephaly.
Synonym(s): anencephalous

anencephalic

adjective Lacking a brain, as in an anencephalic infant.

an·en·ce·phal·ic

(an'en-sĕ-fal'ik)
Relating to meroencephaly.

anencephaly

(an?en-sef'a-le) [Gr. an-, not, + enkephalos, the brain]
Congenital absence of the brain and cranial vault, with the cerebral hemispheres missing or reduced to small masses. This condition is incompatible with life. In the U.S., it is present in about 11 births out of 100,000. This defect results from the lack of closure of the anterior neural tube. Like other neural tube defects, the risk for anencephaly can be reduced with folic acid supplementation (800 mg daily) taken by women before and during pregnancy. See: neural tube defect
anencephalicanencephalus (an?en-se'fal-ik) (an?en-sef'a-lus), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
the number of anencephalic infants born of adequate size for organ donation matches the number of babies born with HPLS.
Proposals to permit donation from anencephalic infants or condemned prisoners aim to maintain respect for the core values underlying the dead donor rule while concluding that the benefits of relaxing the rule in these marginal cases outweigh the loss in respect for life and trust in the transplant system that might result.
Not a few ethicists, some sporting legal credentials, jumped at the anencephalic issue, and like the proverbial horseman, went riding off in all directions.
Pathologic Findings in a Prospectively Collected Series of Anencephalics," American Journal of Medical Genetics 26:4 (1987), 797-810.
About 95 percent of all anencephalics screened have been detected in this way, and around 95 percent of the detected anencephalics have been electively aborted.
Schenk et al., "Two Rhombencephalic Anencephalics: A Clinical-Pathological and Electroencephalographic Study," Brain 91 (1968), 497-506.
On this third position, therefore, there are no intrinsic interests of anencephalics to be defended.
As Alexander Capron has noted, "whatever their clinical differences from anencephalic babies, hydraencephalics and some microcephalics are conceptually indistinguishable if the characteristic separating anencephalics from normal children is their lethal neurological condition." [11]
Many parents of anencephalic infants want their children's brief lives to have meaning, but their desire to permit organ donation is met with legal roadblocks, sometimes including lawsuits by private groups.
* learn about the characteristics of and prognosis for anencephalic infants