anencephalic

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an·en·ce·phal·ic

(an'en-se-fal'ik),
Relating to meroanencephaly.
Synonym(s): anencephalous

anencephalic

adjective Lacking a brain, as in an anencephalic infant.

an·en·ce·phal·ic

(an'en-sĕ-fal'ik)
Relating to meroencephaly.

anencephaly

(an?en-sef'a-le) [Gr. an-, not, + enkephalos, the brain]
Congenital absence of the brain and cranial vault, with the cerebral hemispheres missing or reduced to small masses. This condition is incompatible with life. In the U.S., it is present in about 11 births out of 100,000. This defect results from the lack of closure of the anterior neural tube. Like other neural tube defects, the risk for anencephaly can be reduced with folic acid supplementation (800 mg daily) taken by women before and during pregnancy. See: neural tube defect
anencephalicanencephalus (an?en-se'fal-ik) (an?en-sef'a-lus), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
She cites the legal history to date on the matter, such as the first statute on the definition of death passed in Kansas in 1970, and refers to a case where parents were prevented from donating the organs of their anencephalic child Theresa.
Indeed, transplant physicians might refuse to retrieve or use organs from anencephalics to prevent erosion of public trust in the organ donation and transplant system.
Proposals to permit donation from anencephalic infants or condemned prisoners aim to maintain respect for the core values underlying the dead donor rule while concluding that the benefits of relaxing the rule in these marginal cases outweigh the loss in respect for life and trust in the transplant system that might result.
Not a few ethicists, some sporting legal credentials, jumped at the anencephalic issue, and like the proverbial horseman, went riding off in all directions.
Organs from Anencephalic Infants: An Idea Whose Time Has Not Yet Come
1] Much of the pressure for such organ donation in fact comes from parents of anencephalic infants, who typically see such transplantations as in their interests.
For the purposes of our argument the anencephalic infant will be considered as any other human being who is permanently unconscious and faces imminent death.
Similarly, the anencephalic newborn regrettably possesses only a minimal degree of uniquely human existence, given the absolute lack of potential for possessing consciousness and the likelihood of imminent death.
On this third position, therefore, there are no intrinsic interests of anencephalics to be defended.
It may soon be generally agreed that anencephalics cannot, if whole brain death criteria are used, be considered organ donors.
The number of anencephalic aborted would probably diminish somewhat if their use as organ sources were to become widely accepted and routinely practiced, given that a fair amount of the impetus toward this in the last year seems to have come as much from parents of anencephalics as from transplant surgeons.
learn about the characteristics of and prognosis for anencephalic infants