anencephalic


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an·en·ce·phal·ic

(an'en-se-fal'ik),
Relating to meroanencephaly.
Synonym(s): anencephalous
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

anencephalic

adjective Lacking a brain, as in an anencephalic infant.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·en·ce·phal·ic

(an'en-sĕ-fal'ik)
Relating to meroencephaly.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anencephaly

(an?en-sef'a-le) [Gr. an-, not, + enkephalos, the brain]
Congenital absence of the brain and cranial vault, with the cerebral hemispheres missing or reduced to small masses. This condition is incompatible with life. In the U.S., it is present in about 11 births out of 100,000. This defect results from the lack of closure of the anterior neural tube. Like other neural tube defects, the risk for anencephaly can be reduced with folic acid supplementation (800 mg daily) taken by women before and during pregnancy. See: neural tube defect
anencephalicanencephalus (an?en-se'fal-ik) (an?en-sef'a-lus), adjective
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Who knew the result of connecting Daddy's brain to his anencephalic clone's brain stem?
And how did it benefit the anencephalic infant to have another couple of months of life in utero, and then five hours of life outside?
Since anencephalic newborns have no brain cortex, brain blood flow and EEG which are used to determine brain death are meaningless.
For example, anencephalic fetuses have a tendency to be born post term, children with Trisomy 18 to be born preterm or post term, and children with Down syndrome to be born early.
When Singer asks why we should "treat the life of an anencephalic human child as sacrosanct and feel free to kill healthy baboons in order to take their organs," (7) he means not only that it is morally acceptable to allow such a child to die of natural causes but that it would be morally permissible to kill such a child, either to "harvest" the organs for transplant or simply because no one sees any good in the child's continued existence.
With the stagnating numbers of brain dead donors and the increased need for organs, new categories of persons under consideration as donors include: anencephalic newborns; non-beating-heart donors and persons revived after suffering cardiac death; executed prisoners (not applicable in Canada); (3) and persons with irreversible brain damage (4) or those persisting in prolonged vegetative states.
In the case of live birth, anencephalic infants have a very short life span typically of a few hours or days.
(7) In the Baby K case, (8) physicians and a hospital ethics committee argued in 1993 that mechanical ventilation of an anencephalic child was "futile" and served "no therapeutic or palliative purpose" and was otherwise medically unnecessary and inappropriate.
Anencephalic Fetuses and Research Embryos: Subjects of Rights?