andromonoecious


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andromonoecious

having male and hermaphrodite flowers on the same plant. Compare ANDRODIOECIOUS.
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During flowering plants segregate into male, female and andromonoecious. The ratio of planting andromonoecious to female is 1:20 for effective pollination and good yield.
Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed in order to detect: a) differences in fruit size and seed number according to epidermis colours, b) differences in fruit size among andromonoecious and hermaphrodite species, and c) differences in seed number among andromonoecious and hermaphrodite species.
Floral herbivore effect on the sex expression of an andromonoecious plant, Isomeris arborea (Capparaceae).
It is especially curious that neither Meagher (1991) nor our study found an effect of relative size on relative success, because in dioecious and andromonoecious species the number of male and female flowers theoretically can be adjusted independently of one another.
Spondias tuberosa Arruda is an andromonoecious deciduous tree of the family Anacardiaceae, that is endemic to the Caatinga, a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) of northeast Brazil (Lima, 1996; Nadia et al., 2007; Prado and Gibbs, 1993).
The ability of individual plants to bear both male and hermaphroditic flowers characterizes the andromonoecious breeding system.
It is self-compatible and andromonoecious; hermaphroditic and male flowers are produced sequentially on the same terminal inflorescences.
Diggle (1993) examined the effect of fruit set (a reflection of the current resource status of a plant), pollination treatment (hand pollinated versus unpollinated) and genotype on the proportion of male flowers per inflorescence in 10 genotypes of the andromonoecious Solanum hirtum (Solanaceae).
In relation to sexual systems, a greater frequency (82.6%) of hermaphroditic species, followed by monoecious plants (8.7%), dioecious (6.5%), and andromonoecious (2.1 %) (represented only by one single species) (Table 1).
For example, the dynamic andromonoecious "phase choice" individuals (see El-Keblawy et al., 1995) represent only 2.8% of the individuals in coastal dunes but constitute 34.6% of individuals in the more arid and unpredictable inland plateau habitat.
The resource costs of gender and maternal support in an andromonoecious umbellifer Smyrnium olusatrum L.