androgynous


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an·drog·y·nous

(an-droj'i-nŭs),
Pertaining to androgyny.

androgynous

(ăn-drŏj′ə-nəs)
adj.
1. Biology Having both female and male characteristics; hermaphroditic.
2. Being neither distinguishably masculine nor feminine, as in dress, appearance, or behavior.

an·drog′y·nous·ly adv.
an·drog′y·ny (-ə-nē) n.

androgynous

adjective Having characteristics of or referring to both sexes.

an·drog·y·nous

(an-droj'i-nŭs)
Pertaining to androgyny.

androgynous

Hermaphroditic. Exhibiting both male and female characteristics. From the Greek andros , a man and gune , a woman.
References in periodicals archive ?
This research investigated the androgynous discourse of Mumtaz Shahnawaz.
Also, participants remaining below medians in both types of points were classified as indifferent and those above these medians were classified as androgynous. Accordingly, 8.47% (26 participants) of participants were classified as feminine, 40.72 % (125 participants) as masculine, 43.00% (132 participants) as androgynous and 7.81 % (24 participants) as indifferent.
Caption: Marissa Lauren wears Androgynous Fox Logo Baseball Tee
Specifically, masculine and androgynous Hispanics are more willing to relocate.
However in a more accommodating approach, Carolyn Heilbrun (1973) suggests we seek out the obscure sources of androgynous principles in myth and literature.
In China, Ma and Wang (2001) showed that androgynous temperament and regional cultural concept are formed by environmental impact, that gender personality traits have sex, grade, and professional facets, and that androgynous personality traits are significantly related to level of mental health.
The second objective was to investigate if there was an association between masculine and androgynous gender role identity and rapid managerial advancement.
For a part androgynous and part English eccentric feel, team wonderfully traditionally tweeds or dogtooth with lived-in jeans.
The term androgynous that the Talmud Sages use is derived from the Greek words andro (male) and gune (female), implying a being that contains both male and female elements.
Allow me to quote from the back cover: "First Moon, the first book in the Goddesses and Warriors series, starts us on a journey to a new genre, a new vision filled with sex and seduction, intrigue, violence and compassion, romance, mystery and adventure as we follow Darkasan, Dieema, and the other Warriors and Goddesses on the exotic planet called Androgynous Prime."
androgynous culture) in the formation of a community of players and audience embodying the conflicts and ambivalences of a society in the process of defining itself.
However, there is little research examining the implications of androgynous names, despite their current popularity.