androgyne


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androgyne

(ăn′drə-jīn′)
n.
An androgynous individual.

androgyne

A person who does not fit into either traditional male or female gender roles or stereotypes, but leans slightly towards the male end of the balance.

androgyne

(ăn′dră-jīn″) [″ + gyne, woman]
A female pseudohermaphrodite.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The suggestion that the figure of Jesus was the archetypical androgyne is the highlight of the relevance between Bakan and the androgyny hypothesis.
The feminine simply serves as a spectacle, the lack against which the androgynous construction is created; and the androgyne itself is too overtly defined by a desire to appropriate the whole structure (akin to Saleem's "urge to encapsulate the whole of reality," 75).
The plenitude, then, that the figure of the androgyne represents is always already a lost plenitude and, like the original eight-limbed all-female and all-male figures, a symbol for what has been lost and cannot be recovered.
Sexual unity is, in fact, 'reconstituted masculinity' where the female becomes male: 'the androgyne myth is not antiquity's answer to androcentrism; it is but one manifestation of it.
Enfin, au niveau supra-humain, il y avait la transgression de la frontiere des sexes par les esprits androgynes et par les chamanes travestis.
Tellingly, in all three novels, Gautier describes the ideal couple as a single being, alluding to the Platonic notion of the original androgyne.
Her masterpiece, her 1970 portrait of Warhol, presents the ideal androgyne, the effeminate male, scarred, girded and, Catholic martyr that he was, floating on an airborne cloud/daybed/sarcophagus.
With androgyne creatures such as David Bowie, Marc Bolan and Brian Eno turning music into an other-worldly, truly beautiful experience, many were surprised when a group of blokes from Wolverhampton became glam rock's leaders.
In Mishnah Bikkurim 1:5, tannaitic Rabbi Eliezer ben Jacob the Elder (185) places the tumtum and androgyne in the same category of woman: "[T]he administrator, the agent, the slave, the woman, the tumtum, and the androgyne can bring the first fruits but they cannot say the blessing because they cannot say 'that you gave me, G-d.
The fulfillment of desire then consists in the (re)union of two complementary bodies--the male with male, the female with the female, and the androgyne with his or her other half, once more forming an originary whole.
Such serious consideration of the sexual nature of the androgyne, may have been one of the factors that led Woolf to the realization that her narrative had turned out to be less whimsical than she expected.
The second three--on the sacred geography of the Kubjika tantras (complemented by twenty-three pages of maps, diagrams, and figures), scriptural representations of the goddess Kubjika as an androgyne, and the cult of Kubjika in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal--shade increasingly toward a historical, anthropological, and sociological synthesis.