androgenize

(redirected from androgenization)
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androgenize

(ăn-drŏj′ə-nīz′)
tr.v. androge·nized, androge·nizing, androge·nizes
To treat with male hormones, usually in large doses.

an·drog′e·ni·za′tion (-nĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Awang, "Maternal use of ginseng and neonatal androgenization," JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.
[20] found 2D: 4D in MFT similar to that in control female which is consistent with our findings for the right hand (0.920 versus 0.91) confirming lower androgenization effects in MFT during embryogenesis.
Dominguez et al., "Postnatal androgenization induces premature aging of rat ovaries," Steroids, vol.
On Doping in East Germany, see Werner Franke and Brigitte Berendonk, "Hormonal Doping and Androgenization of Athletes: A Secret Program of the German Democratic Republic Government", Clinical Chemistry 43 (1997): 1262-79.
Reference to the androgenization of the female body by the removal of a major secondary sex characteristic such as the breast, and androgenization enhanced by the defiant display of the body refigured through surgery, provides the opportunity to inquire into the way in which the gaze invited by these photographs is concomitantly restructured.
sepium, commonly termed Chinese silk vine and also, in pinyin, xiangjiapi or gangliupi, has been implicated in two Canadian cases as likely having been subst ituted for eleuthero/'Siberian ginseng': one case was associated with neonatallmaternal androgenization, and the other with interference with digoxin assay, producing apparently elevated digoxin levels (D.V.C.
ATLANTA -- Possible metabolic and endocrine effects, including bone loss and androgenization, should be kept in mind when managing women on antiepileptic drugs, Dr.
Chavez-Genaro, "Ovarian follicular dynamics after aromatizable or non aromatizable neonatal androgenization," Journal of Molecular Histology, vol.
Franke & Brigitte Berendonk, Hormonal Doping and Androgenization of Athletes: A Secret Program of the German Democratic Republic Government, 43 Clinical chemistry 1262 (1997).
The report details the use of anabolic steroids by athletes in a variety of sports, but their use with adolescent girls, particularly swimmers beginning at 14 years of age, is frightening: "The treatment of young girls with androgenic hormones was especially rewarding in the medal-rich swimming events, where it secured consistent international success." The authors caution parents around the world: "Even the androgenization of young girls has been, and remains, a documented practice in the sport system of countries outside the GDR and the socialist system." Franke WW, Berendonk B.
We refer to this disruption as "metabolic androgenization" because the elimination of inactivate androgen is inhibited and the rate of testosterone conversion to derivatives that are variously androgenic in vertebrates is increased (3).
The androgenic changes in phenotype were obvious in 1968 at the Olympic Games in Mexico City, and one of us (B.B.), a finalist in the discus throw there, later described in several articles (e.g., [50, 51, 56, 57]) the imminent threat of androgenization to women's sport and proposed out-of-competition control by analyzing athletes' urine with gas chromatography.