ancestor

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an·ces·tor

(an'ses-tōr),
A person in the direct line of descent from which a subject of interest is derived (for example, parents or grandparents; but no collaterals or descendants).

ancestor

(ăn′sĕs′tər)
n.
1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
2. Biology The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.

ancestor

Etymology: L, antecessorem
one from whom a person is descended, through the mother or the father. The term assumes a direct line of descent, excluding collateral family members of previous generations.
References in periodicals archive ?
You may be a Geordie, but Ancestry DNA tests your genetic make-up over 80 to 100 generations
For the study, 344 Greek Cypriot men with no biological relationship and whose paternal grandfathers had confirmed Greek Cypriot ancestry were selected from the general population.
3m paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and more than 1.
Reich and lab members, Swapan Mallick and Nick Patterson, teamed up with previous laboratory member Sriram Sankararaman, now an Assistant Professor of computer science at the University of California, Los Angeles, on the project, which found evidence that both Denisovan and Neanderthal ancestry has been lost from the X chromosome, as well as genes expressed in the male testes.
Members of the Ancestry team will also be on hand meet visitors and provide further information on Ancestry's products and services.
In multivariate regression analyses that accounted for lean mass, fat mass, height, and age, African American ancestry was independently associated with more advanced skeletal maturation in both girls (P = .
In addition, "African Ancestry Radio" will feature discussions on how a person's roots influence personality, who they are and how they act.
European ancestry also is common among both Mexicans and Puerto Ricans.
Similar variations were found for prediabetes (most common in participants of Mexican ancestry and least common in those of Dominican ancestry) and diabetes (most common in those of Dominican, Puerto Rican, and Mexican ancestry and least common in those of South American ancestry).
Number of New Yorkers claiming Irish ancestry, among the most of any state.
Writers post articles on subjects ranging from gaining dual citizenship through jus sanguinis, to discovering if you have Neanderthal DNA genealogy, to offering great tips on how best to conduct your own ancestry searches.
Tim Sullivan, president and chief executive officer of Ancestry.