anatopism


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a·nat·o·pism

(ă-nat'ō-pizm),
Failure to conform to the cultural pattern.
[G. ana, backward, + topos, place]

anatopism

An obsolete term for social inappropriateness, socially inappropriate.
References in periodicals archive ?
We find the anatopism of Claudius's comment to Gertrude in the wake
As the action of the play begins, Dekker evokes sites of local topography through the convention of anatopism. Through this practice, Darryl Grantley explains, "remote locations--in terms of geography, period or myth--were readily understood to represent English society in general, and even specifically London," and Dekker employs it to situate his dual interest in local urban places and their literary contexts.
(1) He mobilizes various forms of anachronism and "anatopism" (spatial misplacement) in order to depict multiple traumatic legacies.
The most immediately observable consequence for Buida is the absence among the new settlers of a sense of place, a condition that might be called anatopism.
Chapter 3 announces itself as an argument that the generic category "city comedy" has outlived its usefulness; but whether or not this is the case, the real interest of the chapter lies in Bruster's striking claim that the "anatopism" of Renaissance theater - its insistent conflation of remote and proximate geographical sites - was not mere "geographical blundering" but rather the formal device which most clearly articulated its complex identification with the market.