anatomize

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Related to anatomized: dissect

anatomize

(ə-năt′ə-mīz′)
tr.v. anato·mized, anato·mizing, anato·mizes
To dissect (an animal or other organism) to study the structure and relation of the parts.

a·nat′o·mi·za′tion (-mĭ-zā′shən) n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The anatomized body analyzed in chapter 5 is that of an unknown woman: namely, the female criminal executed in Padua around 1541 and portrayed in the center of the elaborate frontispiece of Andreas Vesalius's On the Fabric of the Human Body, first published in 1543.
Throughout his career, William Kennedy has anatomized life in Albany, New York, city of his birth and muse to his imagination.
In most of his plays up to now, Ayckbourn has anatomized the closing-off of emotions out of embarrassment or fear, not to mention the suspicions that uneasily unite people who would be far happier kept apart.
Thus, this entry is anatomized to reveal a general crisis in French political thought and society.
Moving further afield, Levi-Strauss's bricolage--"one of the few technical terms which [Simon] uses with any regularity and confidence"--is anatomized in connection with Simon and the work of Louise Nevelson and Robert Rauschenberg.
Some of the images that are presented--of anatomized bodies (including flap-anatomies), genetic mutations, mechanized statues, and busts based on death masks--provide interesting supplements to our knowledge of Renaissance visual culture.
One example will have to suffice: in the fine chapter on Paradise Lost, one welcomes an emphasis on Milton's transformation of the epic by "making the self-governance of the Edenic couple central to his poem" (256), but self-governance is no less central to The Faerie Queene, and many aspects of that endeavor are more elaborately anatomized by Spenser than by Milton.
As we begin seeking for a critique of the model, we might look to the great Renaissance anatomists of the human reproductive organs whom we know to be sharply critical of Galen: Realdus Columbus (best known perhaps for his claim to have "discovered" the clitoris), who reprimanded Galen for saying that the human uterus was similar to the uterus in animals [6] and Andreas Vesalius, whose work is peppered with acusations that Galen wrote about the human uterus without ever having anatomized or even closely inspected one: that instead Galen had described the uterus of dogs and cows.