anatomist

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anatomist

 [ah-nat´o-mist]
one skilled in anatomy.

a·nat·o·mist

(ă-nat'ŏ-mist),
A specialist in the science of anatomy.

anatomist

(ə-năt′ə-mĭst)
n.
An expert in or a student of anatomy.

a·nat·o·mist

(ă-nat'ŏ-mist)
A specialist in the science of anatomy.

anatomist

one skilled in anatomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul Aegineta, Avicenna, Rhasis, in short all the schools of the Greeks and Arabs echo with nothing but this; and almost all anatomists sing it so.
Cardano was a user and consumer of contemporary anatomical texts, rather than a research anatomist like Vesalius; his writing on anatomy thus allows Siraisi to get away from the focus on great anatomists that has largely characterized histories of the subject (including Cunningham's), to see how medical professionals received and interpreted their work.
56) But it is only in the next generation that anatomists began to rely heavily on unofficial or extralegal sources of supply.
Buffon's concept of whites "degenerating" into blacks helped inspire anatomists to catalog the differences between these groups.
However, they were also seen as mysterious and unfathomable, most especially so in scenes of dissection featuring anatomists dealing with dead female bodies.
Messbarger convincingly argues for Morandi's place within Enlightenment science, and not, as Crespi and most later biographers suggested, merely as the dutiful wife of one of Bologna's premier wax anatomists.
It is really interesting and really bizarre, very different from anything we've seen in vertebrates," study author Diane Kelly, an anatomist at the University of Massachusetts said.
Instead, Prehistoric Autopsy sees Professor Alice Roberts and Dr George McGavin joining forces with a team of leading anatomists, anthropologists, archaeologists and special effects gurus to teach us more about one of our closest ancestors.
More than 150 Anatomists from all over India participated and presented scientific papers.
This disconcerting observation is of considerable concern, since it suggests that today's anatomists give the appearance of being ill equipped to face up to the ethical demands presented by multicultural societies.
Instead, Webb points out how Harvey (as well as other anatomists like Mondino de' Liuzzi) insisted on seeing in the dissected or vivisected hearts impossible structures that cohered to medieval concepts rather than to observation of the muscle.
He looks into all aspects of the subject, from the backgrounds of the anatomists to the process of procuring and preserving of the bodies before relating the story of the autopsy itself.