anatomist


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Related to anatomist: anatomy

anatomist

 [ah-nat´o-mist]
one skilled in anatomy.

a·nat·o·mist

(ă-nat'ŏ-mist),
A specialist in the science of anatomy.

anatomist

(ə-năt′ə-mĭst)
n.
An expert in or a student of anatomy.

a·nat·o·mist

(ă-nat'ŏ-mist)
A specialist in the science of anatomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
To achieve this purpose, the Chinese and Korean situations and teaching methods were intensively compared; the opinions on best practices and recommendations were collected from the medical students and anatomists at both schools.
However, they were also seen as mysterious and unfathomable, most especially so in scenes of dissection featuring anatomists dealing with dead female bodies.
In these two chapters Messbarger argues that the "Lady Anatomist's study of the sense and sex organs not only would deny the male-female opposition relentlessly ascribed to these realms of the body, but would allay the rivalry and conceive new alliances between theory and practice, perception and cognition, science and art, manual and mental labor, art and craft, life and death, male and female" (108).
This disconcerting observation is of considerable concern, since it suggests that today's anatomists give the appearance of being ill equipped to face up to the ethical demands presented by multicultural societies.
Pugnaire, senior associate dean for educational affairs at UMass Medical and a trained anatomist before converting to family medicine.
Her boldest claim, and the one that historians will debate, is that anatomists were just as focused on the interior of the female body, particularly the genitalia, as they were on the presumptively normative male body.
Where the Abrams book serves as a handy guide to possible journeys through the art of anatomy, the Taschen publication is the Grand Tour itself Its 714 pages contain all the plates from the eight volumes produced by French anatomist Jean Baptiste Marc Bourgery (1797-1849) and his primary artistic accomplice, Nicolas Henri Jacob (1782-1871).
Anatomical Record (Part B: New Anatomist) 2003;270B:4-15.
At the heart of the museum lies an extraordinary collection of over 3,500 anatomical and pathological preparations, specimens of natural history, fossils, paintings and drawings assembled by the Scottish-born surgeon and anatomist John Hunter (1728-93).
These fossilists, about 10 persons, included a woman who collected and sold bones as a way of making a living, an Oxford professor, physicians who studied fossils as a side interest, and a French anatomist. The author elaborates the issues they wrestled with as they tried to make sense of the fossils they found.
Caspari and Lee's results are "probably valid," remarks anatomist Jay Kelley of the University of Illinois in Chicago.
Historians now suspect that a drunkard 17th century friar who stole bones from the poet's tomb, or a 19th century anatomist who recorded that the skull disintegrated on contact with air but could have easily kept the skull for himself and replaced it with a damaged substitute, are behind the mystery.