anatomic orientation

anatomic orientation

A term of art referring to the positioning of a specimen received in the surgical pathology cutting suite according to its anatomic landmarks, ideally assisted by the surgeon or by cross-referencing the specimen with radiographs (as in the case of breast lumpectomies), and which forms the basis for subsequent sectioning of the tissue and assessment of margin involvement or clearance.
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The use of CT images, 3 dimensional (3D) reconstruction models and better anatomic orientation can be easily evaluated during multi-plane reformatting (Tomlinson et al.; Raes et al.; Claerhoudt et al.).
Clinical presentation of coronary arteriovenous fistula according to age and anatomic orientation. Caspian Journal of Internal Medicine.
Their topics include thyroid: identifying and preserving the recurrent laryngeal nerves, lymph: managing the extra-nodal extension in the lateral neck, gastric: reconstructing the gastrointestinal tract, rectum: proximal vascular ligation, abdomen: reconstructing the perineum, esophagus: resection of the primary tumor to negative margins, and melanoma: anatomic orientation of the excision.
Further, accurate mapping is critical to helping the examiner understand the anatomic orientation of the specimen, a key prerequisite that enables accurate communication from the dermatopathologist back to the clinician if there's a question regarding the need for retreatment, he added.
The anatomic orientation of the myocardial fibers making up the sleeves is highly variable (Figure 2(d)).
Also, the prostate lies in a much better anatomic orientation when one goes through the bladder," he says.