anastomosis

(redirected from anastomoses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to anastomoses: arterial anastomosis

anastomosis

 [ah-nas″to-mo´sis] (pl. anastomo´ses) (Gr.)
1. communication between two tubular organs.
2. surgical, traumatic, or pathologic formation of a connection between two normally distinct structures. adj., adj anastomot´ic.
arteriovenous anastomosis
anastomosis between an artery and a vein.
Simple arteriovenous anastomosis. From Dorland's, 2000.
crucial anastomosis an arterial anastomosis in the upper part of the thigh, formed by the anastomotic branch of the sciatic artery, the internal circumflex artery, and the first perforating and transverse portions of the external circumflex artery.
end-to-end anastomosis
1. an anastomosis connecting the end of an artery and that of some other vessel, either directly or with a synthetic graft.
2. anastomosis of two sections of colon, such as with partial colectomy or when an ileostomy is closed.
end-to-side anastomosis an anastomosis connecting the end of one vessel with the side of a larger one.
heterocladic anastomosis one between branches of different arteries.
ileorectal anastomosis surgical anastomosis of the ileum and rectum after total colectomy, as is sometimes performed in the treatment of ulcerative colitis.
intestinal anastomosis establishment of a communication between two formerly distant portions of the intestine.

a·nas·to·mo·sis

, pl.

a·nas·to·mo·ses

(ă-nas'tō-mō'sis, -sez), This word is properly used only in reference to tubular or hollow structures, not to nerves.
1. A natural communication, direct or indirect, between two blood vessels or other tubular structures.
2. An operative union of two structures (for example, vessels, ureters, nerves).
3. An opening created by surgery, trauma, or disease between two or more normally separate spaces or organs.
[G. anastomōsis, from anastomoō, to furnish with a mouth]

anastomosis

(ə-năs′tə-mō′sĭs)
n. pl. anastomo·ses (-sēz)
1. The connection of separate parts of a branching system to form a network, as of leaf veins, blood vessels, or a river and its branches.
2. Medicine The surgical connection of separate or severed tubular hollow organs to form a continuous channel, as between two parts of the intestine.

a·nas′to·mot′ic (-mŏt′ĭk) adj.

anastomosis

Anatomy
An interconnecting aggregation of blood vessels or nerves that form a network plexus.
 
Surgery
(1) Any opening between two normally separate spaces, lumina or organs, regardless of the manner—surgical, traumatic or pathological—in which the opening was created.
(2) The surgical connection between two tubular structures (e.g., end-to-end anastomosis of the colon or rectum) after a cancerous segment has been excised, or end-to-side anastomosis of a saphenous vein during a CABG.

a·nas·to·mo·sis

, pl. anastomoses (ă-nas'tŏ-mō'sis, -mō'sēz)
1. A natural communication, direct or indirect, between two blood vessels or other tubular structures. usage note Not correctly applied to nerves.
See: communication
2. An operative union of two hollow or tubular nonneural structures.
3. An opening created by surgery, trauma, or disease between two or more normally separate spaces or organs.
[G. anastomōsis, from anastomoō, to furnish with a mouth]

anastomosis

A direct surgical connection formed between two tubular structures by stitching or a communication between an artery and a vein without intervening smaller vessels.

Anastomosis

Surgical re-connection of the ends of the bowel after removal of a portion of the bowel.

anastomosis 

A natural communication between two blood vessels or other tubular structures. Example: the long posterior ciliary artery divides into two branches as it enters the posterior part of the ciliary muscle and at its anterior end these branches anastomose with each other and with the anterior ciliary arteries to form the major arterial circle of the iris. See major arterial circle of the iris.

a·nas·to·mo·sis

, pl. anastomoses (ă-nas'tŏ-mō'sis, -mō'sēz)
1. A natural communication, direct or indirect, between two blood vessels or other nonneural tubular structures.
2. An opening created by surgery, trauma, or disease between two or more normally separate spaces or organs.
[G. anastomōsis, from anastomoō, to furnish with a mouth]
References in periodicals archive ?
Associacao de Rhizoctonia solani Grupo de Anastomose 4 (AG-4 HGI e HGIII) a especies de plantas invasoras de area de cultivo de batata.
Forrest supposition that muscles situated in close proximity to anastomotic branches and supplied by them, have a double innervation, was supported by Harness & Sekeles, they conclude that terminal motor anastomoses between the median and ulnar nerves might be more frequent than had been reported.
With the use of a robotic system, the goal is to bridge the gap in the quality and speed of anastomoses between the experienced surgeon and a specialist who does not possess special skills in microsurgery [67].
Functional and surgical anastomoses are distinct for overlap anastomosis, and postoperative passage depends on patency at the functional anastomosis (blue area), not on the length of the staple line at the surgical anastomosis (red area).
Their data showed that RGTA11 caused increased anastomotic bursting pressure 2 days after construction of the anastomoses but not after 4 or 7 days.
Caption: Figure 5: Drawing of the transplant showing ischemic area and all three vascular anastomoses.
The efficacy of these anastomoses techniques has been studied widely in terms of their effects on intra-luminal diameter, wound healing and post-operative complications.
Anastomoses are most commonly used in bowel surgery and weight-loss ops for obese patients.
Effects of amniotic membrane on the healing of primary colonic anastomoses in the cecal ligation and puncture model of secondary peritonitis in rats.
If an enterectomy and anastomoses are required, the use of a serosal or a collagen patch has been reported in a macaw (Ara species), (9) an eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus), (10) and a Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) (11) and should be considered an option to prevent adhesions and to increase rates of healing.