anankastic

anancastic

adjective An older term referring to obsessive-compulsive thoughts and behaviours; it is not used in the working medical parlance, replaced by obsessive-compulsive.

anankastic

, anancastic (an″ăn-kas′tik) [Gr. anankastikos, compulsory]
Pert. to compulsion, esp. to obsessive-compulsive disorder.
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The most common personality traits were anankastic 1170(88%), schizoid 932(70%) and dependent 705(53%).
Conclusion: Anankastic, schizoid and dependent personality traits and disorders were the commonest on screening and detailed interview.
Moreover, personality disorder renders the treatment of a co-existing psychiatric or medical condition more com plex, longer and less li kely to be successful.5 ICD-10 divides personality disorders into 9 subtypes i.e., paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, emotionally unstable - impulsive type, emotionally unstable-borderline type, histrionics, anxious (avoidant), anankastic and dependent personality disorders.2
And secondly, each of these requirements played not only a regulative (motivational) anankastic role over him, but also a regulative (evaluative) role as standard to assess his actions.
Secondly, regarding the legal power whose exercise entails autonomous effects, which characterizes private law persons, the general requirement of contractual capacity--Geschaftsfahigkeit--that is presupposed by the rules of special contract law serves as an example of the relation between legal power-conferring rules and procedural rules of legal power which impose anankastic duties.
As can be seen in the table, cluster 2 participants score significantly higher in all the variables (p < .003, using the Bonferroni adjustment to control for type I error), except for anankastic PD.
Linda, the nurse who helped Nina, was given as an example of anankastic personality disorder.
Most prevalent personality disorder was emotionally unstable borderline type with a phi correlation of 0.831 followed by emotionally unstable impulsive type and anankastic personality disorder with phi correlations of 0.930 and 0.867 respectively for definite cases.
ICD-10 has anankastic anxious and dissocial instead of obsessive compulsive avoidant and antisocial personality disorders respectively.4 Moreover in ICD-10 borderline and impulsive are considered subtypes of emotionally unstable personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder is not included.4
They found four higher order factors among the 12 personality disorder categories which they named antisocial (high loadings from conduct disorder, borderline, narcissistic, histrionic and paranoid), asocial (schizoid), asthenic (avoidant, dependent and self-defeating) and anankastic (obsessive-compulsive).
In view of the growing consensus around a four-factor model of personality disorders and the four factors found in analysis of the scree slope from the present data, confirmatory factor analysis was used to test a four-factor model of what others have called the four As: asthenic, asocial, antisocial and anankastic (Mulder & Joyce, 1997).
For ICD-10, test-retest correlations ranged from .29 for the histrionic scale to .64 for the paranoid, anankastic and the anxious scales, with a mean test-retest correlation of .56.