anamorphosis


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Related to anamorphosis: Anamorphic image

an·a·mor·pho·sis

(an'ă-mōr-fō'sis),
1. In phylogeny, a progressive series of changes in the evolution of a group of animals or plants.
2. In optics, the process of correcting a distorted image with a curved mirror.
[G. ana, up, + morphē, form]

anamorphosis

(ăn′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. anamorpho·ses (-sēz′)
1.
a. An image that appears distorted unless it is viewed from a special angle or with a special instrument.
b. The production of such an image.
2. Evolutionary increase in complexity of form and function.
References in periodicals archive ?
another moment that presents itself as the rule of anamorphosis and its
An early representative example appears in chapter 1, in a two-page paragraph that starts by defining "the word anamorphosis, a Greek neologism" (18), refers quickly to Martin Kemp, lists "Durer, Galileo, Lomazzo, and da Vinci" (19), references Ben Jonson, quotes Andrew Marvell, and then goes on for one more page.
As stated at the outset, humanity is moving from evolutionary consciousness toward conscious evolution due in part to our recognition and greater understanding of the systems thinking principle of anamorphosis.
The following three chapters look more specifically at the function of anamorphosis within literary texts during the middle decades of the seventeenth century.
The standard example of anamorphosis in painting, Hans Holbein's 1533 "The Ambassadors," depicts two richly dressed gentlemen surrounded by a variety of objects that indicate their wealth, intellect and prestige.
In fact, anamorphosis is a perfect model through which to read Fantasy and the Gothic, especially, one might add, Mieville's own self-consciously hybridic fiction.
Anamorphosis, Cervantes, and the Early Picaresque, Indiana, Purdue University, 2001.
In fact, the overwhelming impact of this show at once plunged the viewer into an almost Baroque exercise in perspectival anamorphosis.
He used a technique called anamorphosis which uses perspective to create 3-D images on two dimensional planes.
Anamorphosis is the exemplary test case because, unlike linear perspective schemes that treat the eye as disembodied (a "mind's eye"), it invokes a series of "ludic juxtapositions" (25) between the Cartesian subject and the ideal viewpoint of linear perspective.
The play between appearance and reality (with the relevance of the mirror image and connections with the Freudian theory of the uncanny-das Unheimliche) leads Mangini to approach anamorphosis from a literary point of view, relating it to the treatment of the fantastic in three Italian authors, Capuana, Papini, and Pirandello.
The phenomenon of visual masking is revealed as anamorphosis in subject's perception of two instantaneous visual stimuli, presented within a short time interval.