anamorphosis

(redirected from anamorphoses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

an·a·mor·pho·sis

(an'ă-mōr-fō'sis),
1. In phylogeny, a progressive series of changes in the evolution of a group of animals or plants.
2. In optics, the process of correcting a distorted image with a curved mirror.
[G. ana, up, + morphē, form]

anamorphosis

(ăn′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. anamorpho·ses (-sēz′)
1.
a. An image that appears distorted unless it is viewed from a special angle or with a special instrument.
b. The production of such an image.
2. Evolutionary increase in complexity of form and function.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, one must remember that the last characteristic trait of anamorphoses is the physical presence of death in the painting, generally through the apparition, in the lateral, second-time vision, of a death's-head springing into view in lieu of an anodyne or deformed object in the frontal, first-time vision: this anodyne or deformed object is, of course, the "floating object," deprived of meaning, which Lacan describes in his Seminar XI precisely when talking about H olbein's Ambassadors.
58 I will not be dealing with catoptric or reflective anamorphoses here, which figure prominently in book 2 of Niceron's treatise.
Ces objets sont deformes par l'angle sous lequel il les observe, si bien que ses textes ne sont vraiment comprehensibles que dans la mesure ou une anamorphose est comprehensible, a condition que le lecteur retrouve le point de vue qui gauchit la perspective, et ce point de vue, c'est l'oeil, c'est le regard d'Andre Breton.
The title of the eleventh chapter of this seminar is "L'Amour courtois en anamorphose.
Quand vous etes sous un certain angle, vous voyez surgir dans le miroir cylindrique l'image dont il s'agit--celle-ci est une tres belle anamorphose d'un tableau de crucifixion, imite de Rubens [.
Il faut noter que Diderot emploie le mot "prince" et non "buste": il y a la deviation du personnage fictif en personnage reel, par anamorphose.
Dans l'ironie, on peut considerer qu'a un meme Signifiant (le mot dans sa forme materielle, graphique), correspond deux signifies: le signifie auquel il renvoie effectivement dans l'usage courant, "normal", de la langue (c'est la "signification propre" du mot selon Beauzee), et, le signifie oppose sur lequel joue precisement l'ironiste (signifie deforme: distorsion par anamorphose, comme dans un miroir concave, ou une personne mince apparait obese--ou l'inverse)(24).
L'ironie est bien une anamorphose, car, tout comme la mystification, elle reprend et deforme le sens des termes, en leur imprimant un sens contraire celui qu'ils ont couramment.
Dans ses breves reponses (nettement inspirees de Rabelais) a Mademoiselle Dornet, Diderot reprend, repete et devie, par anamorphose, les propos de Madame Therbouche et de Desbrosses, en leur inflechissant un ton particulier, qui est caracteristique de l'ironie et de la mystification.