anamorphosis

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an·a·mor·pho·sis

(an'ă-mōr-fō'sis),
1. In phylogeny, a progressive series of changes in the evolution of a group of animals or plants.
2. In optics, the process of correcting a distorted image with a curved mirror.
[G. ana, up, + morphē, form]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

anamorphosis

(ăn′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. anamorpho·ses (-sēz′)
1.
a. An image that appears distorted unless it is viewed from a special angle or with a special instrument.
b. The production of such an image.
2. Evolutionary increase in complexity of form and function.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
L'auteur developpe les deux acceptions du mot anamorphose, l'une ayant trait a l'optique, l'autre a la zoologie.
Pour l'illustrer, Lacan prend appui sur le phenomene de l'anamorphose telle qu'elle a ete utilisee par Hans Holbein dans son tableau Les Ambassadeurs (Die Gesandten, 1533).
We are also faced with one of the characteristic traits of anamorphoses, that is to say a blatant disjunction between a signifier and a signified: indeed, for the wedding photograph to function as a sign (i.e, the "conjunction of a signifier and a signified"), it would have to show in its center, as its signifier or visual trace, the newlyweds, so as to signify their marriage.
Indeed, one must remember that the last characteristic trait of anamorphoses is the physical presence of death in the painting, generally through the apparition, in the lateral, second-time vision, of a death's-head springing into view in lieu of an anodyne or deformed object in the frontal, first-time vision: this anodyne or deformed object is, of course, the "floating object," deprived of meaning, which Lacan describes in his Seminar XI precisely when talking about H olbein's Ambassadors.
"Rationalite de l'Anamorphose." XVII siecle (July-Sept.