analyze

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analyze

(ăn′ə-līz′)
tr.v. ana·lyzed, ana·lyzing, ana·lyzes
1. To examine methodically by separating into parts and studying their interrelations.
2. Chemistry To make a chemical analysis of.
3. Mathematics To make a mathematical analysis of.
4. To psychoanalyze.

an′a·lyz′a·ble adj.
an′a·ly·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
an′a·lyz′er n.

analyze

(an′ăl-īz″) [Ult. fr. Gr. analyein, to loose, loosen, analyze]
To separate into parts; to examine methodically.
References in periodicals archive ?
One hundred and three (103) patients out of 158, with at least possible or more severe CAN at first laboratory assessment, had a second complete and analyzable testing.
Out of the 50 ECG recordings, 8 were not analyzable (6 due to atrial fibrillation and 2 due to pacing spikes and/or other frequent arrhythmia) resulting in forty-two 24 h ECGs for detailed ECG analysis.
Smaller areas of research deserve also notification since they are analyzable.
The models of the method of exact absorbing conditions are quite universal and the spectrum of phenomena and situations analyzable within each of these are extremely wide.
Having conceded that modal pluralism is true, a theory of analysis must account for it; that is to say that the theory must provide in principle for each mode to be analyzable into a form that makes it apt for appraisal.
Some of these correspond to particular circumstances of time and place (Hayek, 1945), knowledge linked to information (Arrow, 1973; Williamson, 1985), specific knowledge (Fama and Jensen, 1983a,b), tacit and explicit knowledge (Polanyi, 1962; Nonaka, 1991), analyzable or non-analyzable knowledge (Perrow, 1967, 1970), human capital (Becker, 1993), organizational routines (Nelson and Winter, 1982), core competences (Prahalad and Hamel, 1990), and knowledge linked to the organizational context and to practice (Weick and Roberts, 1993; Tsoukas, 1996; Spender, 1996, 2007, 2008).
Nonetheless, they have in common certain general functional and structural attributes that are recognizable, analyzable, and predictable.
McGinn's list (39) of "arguably" simple or primitive concepts includes the concept "red." Now it would seem that a necessary condition of something being red is that it is closer to pink than it is to blue (to use McGinn's own example, 97), and thus by his claim that red has a non-circular and non-trivial sufficient condition, i.e., it is analyzable, i.e., it is complex.
Analyzable data at such low velocities could not be found.
By that time, Twitter was enormous in several respects: in its volume of tweets, in its high public profile, and finally in the presumptive value of the collected tweets as a searchable, analyzable database.
This technique with its qualitative characteristics, which certainly does not exclude quantitative ones,1 enabled us to codify different parts of the message emitted and transform them into analyzable data by drawing up exclusion categories.
In [5] a similar work to our paper has been developed for obtaining analyzable Petri Net models from UML sequence diagrams and statecharts.