analysand

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analysand

 [ah-nal´ĭ-sand]
a person undergoing psychoanalysis.

a·nal·y·sand

(ă-nal'i-sand),
In psychoanalysis, the person being analyzed.
[analysis + L. -andus, gerundive ending]

analysand

(ə-năl′ĭ-sănd′)
n.
A person who is being psychoanalyzed.

analysand

A person undergoing psychoanalysis.

a·nal·y·sand

(ă-nal'i-sand)
Someone who is undergoing psychoanalysis.
[analysis + L. -andus, gerundive ending]

analysand

A person undergoing psychoanalysis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This kind of looking after, that actually concerns real care, the way of life [Existenz] of the Other and not a "what" that he looks after helps the other in that way to become transparent to himself in his care and to become free for it.' But this characterizes with great conciseness the behaviour that Freud described as the analyst's only possible, permissible and fruitful way of dealing with his analysand.
(1) I will use the language of "therapists and clients" and "analysts and analysands" as equivalent, although most of this literature was found in psychoanalytic journals.
Just as there is no Other of the Other--that is, no position outside of language that allows us to discuss language as a whole without having to rely on language itself in our discussion--there is no way in which we can step outside the transference situation and invite the analysand to do so with us in order to discuss what is happening in the transference itself.
He is, it seems, more than happy to pay for his analysis with this relative's money, and unlike the two previously mentioned analysands, works very hard at his analysis, being more inclined to blame himself for everything than to blame others--in diagnostic terms, being more obsessive than hysteric.
The analysand understands that he has been seeking to snub his father, but this understanding is no mere interpretation; it is a change in his character, a change in his relation to the world, particularly to other people he loves.
In transposition to the analytical relationship, the analyst is impelled to play a role in the analysand's phantasy.
Berlant is speaking here of intimacy, usually understood as the practice of two people in a love relation, but also, by implication, of the scholar's love of learning, supported by the lost object of excellence: When students and analysands feel suddenly mistrustful of the contexts into which they have entered in order to change, but not traumatically, intimacy reveals itself to be a relation associated with tacit fantasies, tacit rules, and tacit obligations to remain unproblematic.
Being alert and responsive to ambivalence, analysts do not take at face value what they hear from analysands (or from their students); rather, they listen for the chorus of mixed voices relaying the analysand's life stories and present experiences.
More than any other feature, Hetty's silence and confession to Dinah illustrate Peter Brooks' model of narrative transference, where "the analysand's past life is reinvested in the dynamics of the interaction with the analyst" (Psychoanalysis 52).
The second defining principle of analytic love highlighted by the author is a commitment to analysands' safety.
We are left, like analysands, alone with the harsh illumination of isolated facts.
After marrying one of her analysands, Erich Fromm, she founded with him a short-lived sanitarium in Heidelberg based on a mixture of psychoanalytic and orthodox Jewish principles.