analogy


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analogy

 [ah-nal´o-je]
the quality of being analogous; resemblance or similarity in function or appearance, but not in origin or development.

analogy

/anal·o·gy/ (ah-nal´ah-je) the quality of being analogous; resemblance or similarity in function or appearance, but not in origin or development.

analogy

(ə-năl′ə-jē)
n. pl. analo·gies
Biology Correspondence in function or position between organs of dissimilar evolutionary origin or structure.

analogy

(a-nal'o-je) [Gr. analogos, analogy, proportion]
1. Likeness between similar features of two things, allowing a comparison.
2. In biology, similarity in function but difference in structure or origin.
See: homology
References in periodicals archive ?
A central topic of this discussion was the role of computational analogy with respect to the greater AI community, including which problems are best addressed through computational analogy approaches, and which are better suited by a combination of strategies (such as integration with statistical methods or formal methods).
In the end, Anderson argues that the force of analogy in Milton's epic resides in its form.
But there is a vast untapped potential for building software tutors that use analogy to help students learn.
The students explored and created the movements using personal analogy, direct analogy, and compressed conflict.
This essay therefore considers literary promotions of analogical correspondences in the parallels between flora and fauna and those between botanical and domestic language, as well as the conceptual analogy between language as a classificatory system and the vegetable world as a system that can be classified.
What distinguishes analogy from resemblance is the absence of any unified and distributed central meaning in names of resemblance; however, this shared, unified, central meaning is required for all analogical names.
Kennedy's assassination soured the race and also made Humphrey's nomination inevitable, but the Sanders and McCarthy crusade analogy does not bode well for Sanders.
The difference of instruction for these three conditions were: Condition 1 arranged the presentation of surface salience analogy for learning the target concepts in classroom setting (34 boys and 31 girls), Condition 2 arranged the same presentation of surface salience analogy as condition 1 in the on-line learning environment (34 boys and 29 girls), Condition 3 arranged a slightly different analogical reasoning--relational salience analogy--for learning the target concepts in the on-line learning environment (33 boys and 29 girls).
Hofstadter is an American, and Sander is a Frenchman, which poses unique challenges for the composition of their book, challenges which have made their text and their joint study of analogy all the richer.
Gentner gives another illustration distinguishing between literal similarity and analogy by comparing these two assertions: "milk is like water" and "heat is like water" (Gentner 1989).