analogy

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analogy

 [ah-nal´o-je]
the quality of being analogous; resemblance or similarity in function or appearance, but not in origin or development.

analogy

/anal·o·gy/ (ah-nal´ah-je) the quality of being analogous; resemblance or similarity in function or appearance, but not in origin or development.

analogy

(ə-năl′ə-jē)
n. pl. analo·gies
Biology Correspondence in function or position between organs of dissimilar evolutionary origin or structure.

analogy

(a-nal'o-je) [Gr. analogos, analogy, proportion]
1. Likeness between similar features of two things, allowing a comparison.
2. In biology, similarity in function but difference in structure or origin.
See: homology
References in periodicals archive ?
I will summarize their teaching as cases of using analogies to increase students' creativity.
The idea of a blueprint formed by scientific nomenclature might be matched to analogies in both kinds of representation and, in didactic poetry, analogies can also provide the "objective correlative" of the colors and smells and emotional reactions to flowers alongside biological precision.
Avicenna does not address which of these relational analogies concern existence, but his descriptions and examples reveal that relational analogies pertaining to "one principle" concern efficient causes, and those concerning "one goal" are about final causes.
Harrison (1993) described a pedagogical process for using analogies to facilitate teaching.
Discovery learning, multiple representations, analogies, and challenge-based learning are methods for helping students move from memorization to become deep learners.
The analogies are often very clever: how a cell is like a city, why the universe is like raisin bread, why the earth is like a Scotch egg, and how you are like the Ship of Theseus.
Epstein (1994) proposed in his cognitive-experiential self-theory that the use of narratives in the form of analogies is yet another way to experientially engage individuals.
Chapter 8, 'The Semantics of Proportionality: Concept Formation and Judgment', focuses on how Analogies of Proportionality satisfy the secundum quid diversa condition.
In the realm of politics, however, analogies are imperfect and can lead to a distortion of reality in a frustratingly complicated world.
The literature in the field of analogical reasoning has been concerned with two types of analogies (Alexander & et al, 1989; Levinson & Carpenter, 1974; Piaget, 2001; Holyoak, Junn, & Billman, 1984; Sternberg & Downing, 1982; Sternberg & Nigro, 1980).