modulation

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Related to analog modulation: amplitude modulation, digital modulation

modulation

 [mod″u-la´shun]
the normal capacity of cell adaptability to its environment.
antigenic modulation the alteration of antigenic determinants in a living cell surface membrane following interaction with antibody.

mod·u·la·tion

(mod'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. The functional and morphologic fluctuation of cells in response to changing environmental conditions.
2. Systematic variation in a characteristic (for example, frequency, amplitude) of a sustained oscillation to code additional information.
3. A change in the kinetics of an enzyme or metabolic pathway.
4. The regulation of the rate of translation of mRNA by a modulating codon.
[L. modulor, to measure off properly]

modulation

The regulation of the rate at which a specific gene is transcribed.

mod·u·la·tion

(mod'yŭ-lā'shŭn)
1. The functional and morphologic fluctuation of cells in response to changing environmental conditions.
2. Systematic variation in a characteristic (e.g., frequency, amplitude) of a sustained oscillation to code additional information.
3. A change in the kinetics of an enzyme or metabolic pathway.
4. The regulation of the rate of translation of mRNA by a modulating codon.
5. Change in parameters of electrotherapy (e.g., frequency, amplitude).
[L. modulor, to measure off properly]
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 6 is devoted to analog modulation and the role of the Hilbert transformation in defining single-sideband modulation.
Most future portable wireless communication systems rely exclusively on digital modulation in contrast to first-generation systems, which were based on analog modulation. Digital modulation offers increased channel capacity, improved transmission quality, secure communication and the ability to provide other value-added services.[1] However, many of these systems use nonconstant envelope carriers for increased spectral efficiency, thus requiring linear amplification.
Chapter 5 describes analog modulation methods and their application to radio and television broadcasting.
Explanations are given of the various analog modulation formats used and the required bandwidths.
Digital or analog modulation of continuous-wave laser sources forms the basis of encoding and transmitting of information through optical fiber link systems.