analeptic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to analeptic: analeptic drugs

analeptic

 [an″ah-lep´tik]
1. a drug that acts as a stimulant to the central nervous system, such as caffeine or amphetamine.
2. a restorative medicine.

an·a·lep·tic

(an'ă-lep'tik),
1. Strengthening, stimulating, or invigorating.
2. A restorative remedy.
3. A central nervous system stimulant, particularly used to denote agents that reverse depressed central nervous system function.
[G. analēptikos, restorative]

analeptic

(ăn′ə-lĕp′tĭk)
adj.
Restorative or stimulating, as a drug or medication.
n.
A medication used as a central nervous system stimulant.

analeptic

adjective Restorative, invigorating; from Greek analepsis, repairing.
 
noun
(1) A CNS stimulant.
(2) A nonspecific term of waning use for an agent that acts as a “restorative”—e.g., caffeine.

an·a·lep·tic

(an'ă-lep'tik)
1. Strengthening, stimulating, or invigorating.
2. A restorative remedy.
3. A central nervous system stimulant, particularly used to denote agents that reverse depressed central nervous system function.
[G. analēptikos, restorative]

analeptic

1. Any drug, such as doxapram, that stimulates the central nervous system.
2. Generally restorative.
3. Stimulating to the breathing.

an·a·lep·tic

(an'ă-lep'tik)
A central nervous system stimulant, particularly used to denote agents that reverse depressed central nervous system function.
[G. analēptikos, restorative]
References in periodicals archive ?
While neither we nor the deputy are capable of witnessing the central trauma of the lynching that ends Rider's life, what we do witness is the uncontainable truth of the resistance Rider represents to the reader, and the unassailable presence he maintains in the deputy's psyche, which itself cannot be contained by the analeptic summary conveyed by the narrator.
(50) So this photo provides an analeptic vision of the jealous route taken up by neither Vargas nor Welles--a sight offered to us of the originary narrative that the film deflects.
There is in addition a concentrated analeptic focus as each family member delves into the collective past to give her own version of key events (such as the visit to the (fictional) Reykjavik zoo or the holiday in Ireland).
815309 Dietetic beverages and foods; lecithin concentrates as analeptic foods; concentrates based on vitamins and/or minerals: vitamin preparations; mineral food supplements; concentrated food supplements made with carbohydrates; all included in Class 5.
(19) This, rather than the consolations of narrative or the 'analeptic' of place, is the terrain of James's travel writing.
Higgins's fascination with the nature of memory and transience is mirrored in the novel's structure, begun in medias res and followed by an analeptic account of Imogen and Otto's doomed and torturous love affair, allowing us to witness the grim reality of a fading life, half-lived-out through clinging to frail memories.
Her prior defiance--"vous ne le verrez pas"--assumes new connotations in this context, and conditions an analeptic re-reading of its import: you will not see it, the signifier of phallic transgression, on my body.
A patient with chronic hepatitis C and a history of abuse of analeptic drugs who showed hallucinations and delusion with interferon administration.
But as I follow the path of her nonmetaphorical tracing of the path of the "tantalizing" note F of measure 2 as the primary vehicle of the analeptic and the proleptic, of the reorientation of the harmonic complexes with which it is associated, I feel obliged to wonder why she approaches the danger zone of that vulnerable yet invulnerable private language in which "the actual use of the speaker of the language need be the standard for use, no matter what the person might say." Surely, the normative focus is shifted.
It is at this moment that Azorin makes two analeptic revelations: first, he confirms the reader's growing suspicion that the protagonist may be blind; therefore, the reader becomes aware that the narrative is experienced not through the protagonist's eyes, but through those of his companion who becomes metonymic not only for the protagonist's vision, but also for the eyes of the reader.
He is convinced from his deep study of the American puritans (for whom the New World was the New Eden) that the American imagination is also teleological and primarily political, proleptic rather than analeptic. Yet how to explain all those awakenings in our literature, from "Rip Van Winkle" to The Awakening to Faulkner's epiphanies from a past that is never passed?
(92) Up to this point the reader has encountered numerous instances of analeptic narration, some of which are presented as the man's internally focalized memories, others as conventional narrator-generated "flashbacks," which help to fill in the backstory to the plot.