anal wink


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A visible puckering at the margin of the external anal sphincter, evoked by stroking the perianal skin with a pin; absence of an anal wink reflex suggests a defect in either sensory or motor nerves or in the central pathways that mediate this reflex

anal wink

Contraction of the anal sphincter in response to pinprick stimulus of the perineum. This reflex is evidence of normal motor function at S4–S5. It is also known as the anal or anocutaneous reflex.
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A physical examination should follow the history and should include a neurological exam, including testing for the presence or absence of the "anal wink." The absence of this reflex indicates neural damage.
These include abdominal distension; a tight, empty rectum with palpable feces; a gush of liquid stool and air from the rectum after a finger is inserted; occult blood in the stool; weak lower extremities; an absent anal wink; a patulous anus; flat buttocks; and a pilonidal dimple.
The physical exam should include mental and functional status, genital and rectal exam, and a neurologic exam of sacral root integrity (e.g., anal wink, bulbocavernosus reflex).
When he touches the perineum, he looks for an "anal wink" in response: a tensing of the anus that indicates intact reflexes.
The presence of an anal wink and bulbocavemosus reflex suggests an intact S2 through S4 reflex arc.
Examiners would tell a child to bend over, and if their scrutiny was greeted by an "anal wink"--i.e., contraction of the sphincter--they would pronounce the child abused.
The "anal wink," described by Arnold-Long ("Fecal Incontinence"), is a:
The physical exam should include mental and functional status, a genital and rectal exam, and a neurologic exam of sacral root integrity (such as anal wink or bulbocavernosus reflex).
Look for signs of a possible neuromuscular disorder, such as an absent anal wink or a dimple covered by a tuft of hair.