anal gland


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a·nal gland

1. one of a number of large sudoriferous glands in the mucous membrane of the anus;
2. an incorrect synonym for anal sac.
3. paired glands located at approximately the 4- and 8-o'clock positions when animal's anus is viewed from behind, present in dogs and cats. These small round saccular glands are located in the subcutis and produce an odoriferous oily discharge that likely serves to mark territory. They are connected to the terminal anus by a narrow bore tube; may become infected, impacted, abscessed, or neoplastic. Problems are more common in obese, constipated, or inactive animals.

anal gland

Any of the glands in the region of the anus. Synonym: circumanal gland
See also: gland
References in periodicals archive ?
Answer: Anal glands, or sacs, are small glands found near the anus in many mammals, including dogs and cats.
I have noticed the extra fiber bulking up her stool is hopefully helping the anal glands express.
Impacted anal glands can occur with chronically soft stools because the musculature has nothing to push the sac against.
Thus, the histologic pattern of anal gland adenocarcinoma remains to be sharply defined.
Richard Pitcairn, DVM, author of The Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats, recommends treating impacted anal glands with a hot fomentation of either marigold flower (Calendula officinalis) or red clover (Trifolium pratense) blossoms, to soften the contents of the sacs.
Adjacent to the secretory epithelium of the hypobranchial gland is located an acinous glandular-like structure, which could be the rectal or anal gland.
Cats are less likely than dogs to have anal gland problems.
This term was used in one paragraph but the rest of the article referenced anal glands.
Anal gland infections often need quite a long course of antibiotics, either by mouth or infused into the glands themselves.
An alternative hypothesis would be that the adenocarcinomas associated with PPD are actually anal gland adenocarcinomas rather than rectal adenocarcinomas.
Anal gland impaction is a common problem in animals with chronically soft stools because the musculature has nothing to push the sac against.
THERE are a few things that can cause this, including fleas or an allergy, anal gland problems, spinal pain, obsessive compulsive behaviour or stress or frustration.