anaesthesia


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Related to anaesthesia: general anaesthesia

anaesthesia

(ăn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
Variant of anesthesia.

anaesthesia

anaesthesia

(1) Loss of pain sensation, as intentionally induced by drugs or medication.
(2) The loss of sensation. In medicine, this loss is “passive” (i.e., involuntary), as in crossed anaesthesia and tactile anaesthesia; in surgery, the loss of sensation is “active” (i.e., artificially-induced and controlled). Due in part to the potential for confusion, the alternate term, block, is widely preferred for local (surgical) anaesthesia; for systemic (e.g., general, intravenous) anaesthesia, confusion is less likely.
 
Some authors use the term analgesia in the same context as block, a practice which, as with anesthesia, may lend to confusion.

Complications
Nausea, vomiting, aspiration pneumonitis, renal failure, liver dysfunction.

an·es·the·si·a

(an'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Loss of sensation resulting from pharmacologic depression of nerve function or from neurologic dysfunction; may be local, topical, general, or regional, depending on the affected area.
2. Broad term for anesthesiology as a clinical specialty.
Synonym(s): anaesthesia.
[G. anaisthēsia, fr. an- priv. + aisthēsis, sensation]

anaesthesia

Loss of the sensations of touch, pressure, pain or temperature in any part of, or in the whole of, the body. This may be due to injury or disease of nerves or brain, or to deliberate medical interference. Drugs are commonly used to effect either general or local anaesthesia.

anaesthesia 

1. A loss of sensation in a part, or in the whole body, induced by the administration of a drug (an anaesthetic agent).
2. A loss of sensation, usually touch, in a part of the body as a result of some nervous lesion. Example: corneal anaesthesia. Note: also spelt anesthesia. See peribulbar injection.
topical anaesthesia Application of a local anaesthetic agent to an area of the skin or mucous membrane (e.g. conjunctiva) to produce anaesthesia. The application may be via direct instillation, soaked swabs, ointments or sprays. Syn. surface anaesthesia.

an·es·the·si·a

(an'es-thē'zē-ă) Do not confuse this word with analgesia or hypesthesia.
1. Loss of sensation due to pharmacologic depression of nerve function or from neurogenic dysfunction.
2. Broad term for anesthesiology as a clinical specialty.
[G. anaisthēsia, fr. an- priv. + aisthēsis, sensation]

anaesthesia

anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
l)Has the rotation changed your attitude towards anaesthesia as a specialty?
Women operated on under regional anaesthesia and who had a local anaesthetic and NSAID cocktail wound infiltration consumed less morphine in the first 18 hours (1 study, 60 participants; MD -7.
The inclusion criterion was that patients were undergoing phacoemulsification under local anaesthesia.
This year marks the 60th anniversary of the publication in 1948 of the first textbook of regional anaesthesia in Australia.
Conclusion: Apgar score of neonates whose mothers received spinal anaesthesia was better at 1 minute than neonates whose mothers received general anaesthesia but there was no significant difference in Apgar score after 5 minutes in both techniques.
Most doctors had been trained in anaesthesia for 4 weeks or less, while interns; this had not included obstetric anaesthesia for 13% of respondents.
Section C: Anaesthesia for Specific Surgery is the cookbook for various clinical scenarios and like similar handbooks and manuals provides reassurance and instruction to those either entering the specialty or only occasionally providing anaesthesia for certain subspecialties.
INTRODUCTION Obstetric anaesthesia is one of the most important sub-specialties of anaesthesia.
Aqila Khan District Specialist Anaesthesia (BS 18 adhoc) adjusted against the post of Senior District Specialist Anaesthesia (BS-19) has been transferred from Naseerullah Khan Babar Memorial Hospital Peshawar to Maternity Hospital Peshawar against the post of District Specialist
Lack of differential effect by Ultracaine (articaine) and Citanest (prilocaine) in infiltration anaesthesia.
Hence on the basis of pain local anaesthesia was effective in 71% patients and spinal anaesthesia was effective in 61% patients.
In contrast with general anaesthesia, spinal anaesthesia reduces blood loss, improves the view in the operating field by decreasing venous blood pressure, and can lead to a decrease in the length of inpatient stays and overall costs.