anaesthesia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to anaesthesia: general anaesthesia

anaesthesia

(ăn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
Variant of anesthesia.

anaesthesia

(1) Loss of pain sensation, as intentionally induced by drugs or medication.
(2) The loss of sensation. In medicine, this loss is “passive” (i.e., involuntary), as in crossed anaesthesia and tactile anaesthesia; in surgery, the loss of sensation is “active” (i.e., artificially-induced and controlled). Due in part to the potential for confusion, the alternate term, block, is widely preferred for local (surgical) anaesthesia; for systemic (e.g., general, intravenous) anaesthesia, confusion is less likely.
 
Some authors use the term analgesia in the same context as block, a practice which, as with anesthesia, may lend to confusion.

Complications
Nausea, vomiting, aspiration pneumonitis, renal failure, liver dysfunction.

an·es·the·si·a

(an'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Loss of sensation resulting from pharmacologic depression of nerve function or from neurologic dysfunction; may be local, topical, general, or regional, depending on the affected area.
2. Broad term for anesthesiology as a clinical specialty.
Synonym(s): anaesthesia.
[G. anaisthēsia, fr. an- priv. + aisthēsis, sensation]

anaesthesia

Loss of the sensations of touch, pressure, pain or temperature in any part of, or in the whole of, the body. This may be due to injury or disease of nerves or brain, or to deliberate medical interference. Drugs are commonly used to effect either general or local anaesthesia.

anaesthesia 

1. A loss of sensation in a part, or in the whole body, induced by the administration of a drug (an anaesthetic agent).
2. A loss of sensation, usually touch, in a part of the body as a result of some nervous lesion. Example: corneal anaesthesia. Note: also spelt anesthesia. See peribulbar injection.
topical anaesthesia Application of a local anaesthetic agent to an area of the skin or mucous membrane (e.g. conjunctiva) to produce anaesthesia. The application may be via direct instillation, soaked swabs, ointments or sprays. Syn. surface anaesthesia.

an·es·the·si·a

(an'es-thē'zē-ă) Do not confuse this word with analgesia or hypesthesia.
1. Loss of sensation due to pharmacologic depression of nerve function or from neurogenic dysfunction.
2. Broad term for anesthesiology as a clinical specialty.
[G. anaisthēsia, fr. an- priv. + aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
Stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an optimisation strategy for general anaesthesia on postoperative morbidity and mortality in elderly patients (the OPTI-AGED study): A study protocol.
A total laryngectomy was done under local anaesthesia i.e removal of the whole larynx (Voice Box), part of hypopharynx was removed and reconstruction was done and permanent alternative airway was constructed.
We plan to study the effectiveness of local anaesthesia in comparison to regional anaesthesia repairing uncomplicated inguinal hernia by evaluating post-operative pain and postoperative complications.
may require sedation and general anaesthesia. Drugs, such as xylazine, propofol and thiopental sodium are commonly used for sedation and short duration of general anaesthesia in ruminants, including sheep.
Anaesthesia is actually a medical specialty like any other specialty in Medicine.
Effect of delayed supine positioning after induction of spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.
Supplementary routes to local anaesthesia. International Endodontic Journal, 35, 885^896, 2002.
Can a urinary tract symptom score predict the development of postoperative urinary retention in patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia? A prospective study.
The survey targeted one hundred patients each who received spinal anaesthesia and epidural anaesthesia.
The Propofol segment is estimated to account for 29.8% share of the global general anaesthesia drugs market by end of 2015, and is expected to register a robust CAGRs of 5.4% in terms of value during the forecast period.