anaerobe

(redirected from anaerobically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to anaerobically: Anaerobically digested

anaerobe

 [an´er-ōb]
an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.(See accompanying table.) adj., adj anaero´bic.
facultative anaerobe a microorganism that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb, an-ār'ōb),
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of dioxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

/an·aer·obe/ (an´ah-rōb) an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.
facultative anaerobes  microorganisms that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobes  microorganisms that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen; some are killed by oxygen.

anaerobe

(ăn′ə-rōb′, ăn-âr′ōb′)
n.
An organism, such as a bacterium, that can live in the absence of free oxygen.

anaerobe

[aner′ōb]
Etymology: Gk, a + aer, not air, bios, life
a microorganism that grows and lives in the complete or almost complete absence of oxygen. An example is Clostridium botulinum. Anaerobes are widely distributed in nature and in the body. Types include the facultative anaerobe and the obligate anaerobe. Compare aerobe, microaerophile. See also anaerobic infection. anaerobic, adj.

anaerobe

Any organism, usually a bacterium, capable of living without air. Anaerobic pathogens obtain their energy from fermentation; nonpathogenic anaerobes in nature obtain their energy from anaerobic respiration, in which nitrate or sulphate serve as electron acceptors.

The ropharynx, skin, colon and vagina harbor up to 1011 anaerobes/cm3; they are common causes of infection, and may be associated with aerobic flora in infections and abscesses of the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, colon, genital tract, skin and brain; factors controlling anaerobes’ virulence are uncertain.
 
Management
Penicillin for supradiaphragmatic anaerobic infections; clindamycin, metronidazole, chloramphenicol or cephoxatin if the infection is below the diaphragm.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

an organism able to metabolize in the absence of free oxygen, obtaining energy from the breakdown of glucose in ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION. Some anaerobes are obligate, i.e. they can only survive in the absence of oxygen; examples are bacteria that cause food poisoning (see BOTULISM). Others (the majority) can live in either the presence or the absence of oxygen and are called facultative. When oxygen is present, respiration in these types is of the aerobic type involving the KREBS CYCLE to release maximum energy; when oxygen is absent they rely solely on energy released in anaerobic respiration.

Anaerobe

A type of bacterium that does not require air or oxygen to live. Anaerobic bacteria are frequent causes of lung abscess.

anaerobe

microorganism that survives in the absence of free oxygen
  • facultative anaerobe microorganism that lives with or without free oxygen

  • obligate anaerobe microorganism that cannot survive in the presence of free oxygen

an·aer·obe

(an-ār'ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe (an´ərōb),

n a microorganism that can exist and grow only in the partial or complete absence of molecular oxygen.
anaerobe, facultative
n an organism that can grow in the absence or presence of oxygen.

anaerobe

an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.

facultative anaerobe
a microorganism that can grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe
an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The objectives of this study were as follows: to chemically fractionate heavy metals in primary and anaerobically digested sewage sludge; to compare the copper, []inc and nickel extraction efficiencies from sewage sludge using three different low-molecular-weight organic acids, including citric acid (CA), oxalic acid (OA) and acetic acid (AA); to evaluate the influences of factors as concentration, pH and the metal chemical species on the removal efficiency.
Biosolids and urea application rates ANDB, Anaerobically digested biosolids; ADB, aerobically digested biosolids; ds, dry solids Rates Urea ANDB (460kg N [t.
To create biogas, microbes use high temperatures to degrade and anaerobically digest organic matter such as wastewater sludge, landfill, plant materials and manure.
Electrocoagulation of raw POME and anaerobically pretreated POME was performed using Direct Current (DC) electricity of 2.
The waste sludges are digested anaerobically and after that disposed by various methods.
Stored faecal samples were subsequently thawed, subjected to alcohol-shock treatment (9), cultured onto Cycloserine, Cefoxitin, Fructose (CCF) Agar (Fort Richard Laboratories, Auckland), and incubated anaerobically at 36[degrees]C ([+ or -] 1[degrees]C) for 48 hours ([+ or -] 4 hours).
Facultative bacteria produce ATP via aerobic respiration when oxygen is available, but are capable of switching to fermentation to create ATP anaerobically.
Cultures were incubated anaerobically at 37[degrees]C.
Clarifoil films are anaerobically digestible (AD) (a method of advanced composting allowing the production of methane for energy recovery), in line with the waste route for the large majority of the food packaging to be specified for use at London 2012.
We are looking at very similar interactions to those we find in tea - between polyphenol-like molecules and SAM-radical proteins, which are primarily found in bacteria that can live anaerobically (without oxygen).
For the LAB-added and anaerobically fermented treatment, a culture of Lactobacillus salivarius isolated from piglet feces in our laboratory, was incubated anaerobically at 30[degrees]C for 12 h.