anadiplosis


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Related to anadiplosis: Conduplicatio

anadiplosis

An obsolete term for a recurring febrile paroxysm.
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Chinese speak of a carry-over stitch, where you "carry-over" yam from one needle to another without knitting it in; you can tuck the yam into the next row--the classic "carry- over," an etymological equivalent for anadiplosis (doubling, tucking) and for [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (keep one stitch--or word, in poetry--and carry it over to the next row--or line, in verse).
(9.) As indicated by Evans (1989), the 796 balance structures include 280 cases of asyndeton, 115 polysyndetons, 95 anaphora, 62 epistrophe, 20 anadiplosis, and 24 parataxis.
Within the space of two pages, we can encounter anaphora, epistrophe, epanalepsis, anadiplosis, and pocketa-pocketa-queep.
"Dream of a Body" is based on the rhetorical figure of speech called the anadiplosis. One phrase, clause, or sentence ends on a word that is taken up again at the beginning of the following phrase or sentence, creating an echo within the lines and a sense of dispossession: something echoes the speaker's words as she speaks, laying the stress on the repeated word while suggesting shamanistic possession.
Como en una lista epica de honor, aparecen las Agueybanas y Hatueyes, y la reina Anacaona, y al final de la estrofa la rima y la repreticion estilizada de al figura retorica de anadiplosis hacen resaltar la geografia cultural caribena, tan orgullosa en su simbolica sencillez: y por palio el palio inmenso de los cielos de tisu, y no tuvo mas senorio que una hamaca bajo el ala de un bohio y un bohio bajo el ala de un bambu.
No concession is made to readers unfamiliar with such terms as parataxis, hypotaxis, anaphora, anadiplosis, apodosis, protasis, homophony, phonemic and phenomic resemblance, phonetic generation of lexemes, alterity, and deixis, as well as run-on, parallelistic, kinetic, and chiasmic syntax.
These opening lines clearly also exemplify what Puttenham calls 'anadiplosis or the Redouble .
However, if the reader sets aside the rather opportunistic claim that Hunt is a 'rococo' poet, and can see past the critical mannerisms (one is noting Hunt's use of the whole range of classical tropes from anadiplosis to zeugma), Edgecombe gives close and sensitive readings of many passages and poems which subsequent critics must take into account.