anacardic acid

anacardic acid

Any of a family of chemical compounds isolated from the shell of cashew nuts which are related to urushiol and, like it, cause an allergic response on contact. It has been traditionally used as an antimicrobial and appears to be active in bacterial infections with MRSA and tuberculosis, and has been used for tooth abscesses. Indstrially, it has been used for resins, coatings and frictional materials, as an anti-corrosive, and has potential for use in nanotechnology.
References in periodicals archive ?
CNSL it is not pure and contains approximately 90% anacardic acid, a phenolic compound biosynthesized from fatty acids that can be phytotoxic (Correia, David, & David, 2006; Chaves et al., 2010).
In the cashew nut shell, cashew nut shell liquid occurs mainly as anacardic acid (~90%) and cardol around slightly lower than 10%.
Harris et al., "Anacardic acid inhibits the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9," Molecular Pharmacology, vol.
Reducing effect of dietary anacardic acid on body fat pads in rats.
(20) The primary component of cashew nut liquid is anacardic acid, which can be converted to cardanol by thermal decarboxylation.
This oil is mainly composed of anacardic acid (3-n-pentadecylsalicylic acid), cardanol (3-n-pentadecylphenol), cardol (5-n pentadecylresorcinol), and methylcardol (2-methyl-5-npentadecylresorcinol).
[11] revealed the effect of phytochemical and the antimicrobial activity of anacardic acid which had an inhibitory effect on Staphylococcus aureus, Brevibacterium ammoniagenes, Streptococcus mutans, and Propionibacterium acnes.
Reddy, "Synthesis of isonicotinoylhydrazones from anacardic acid and their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis" European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, vol.
Anacardic acid, a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor, modulates LPS-induced IL-8 expression in a human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/o7]
Many acids like formic acid, butyric acid, anacardic acid, acetic acid and hydrochloric acid are found effective in controlling avian coccidiosis (Shobha and Ravindranath, 1991; Garcia et al., 2007; Abbas et al., 2011b, c).
It also acts as an astringent and cauterizing agent due to the phenolic skin stimulant (anacardic acid) found mostly in the skin of the fruit, but also in the fruit itself [6].