amylopectin


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amylopectin

 [am″ĭ-lo-pek´tin]
the insoluble constituent of starch; the soluble constituent is amylose.

am·y·lo·pec·tin

(am'i-lō-pek'tin),
A branched-chain polyglucose (glucan) in starch containing both 1,4 and 1,6 linkages. Compare: amylose.

amylopectin

/am·y·lo·pec·tin/ (am″ĭ-lo-pek´tin) a highly branched, water-insoluble glucan, the insoluble constituent of starch; the soluble constituent is amylose.

amylopectin

(ăm′ə-lō-pĕk′tĭn)
n.
A highly branched polysaccharide of high molecular weight that is one of the two main components, along with amylose, of starches.

am·y·lo·pec·tin

(am'i-lō-pek'tin)
A branched-chain polyglucose (glucan) in starch containing both 1,4 and 1,6 linkages.
Compare: amylose

amylopectin

a carbohydrate polymer, of high molecular weight, composed of branched chains of GLUCOSE units.

amylopectin

the insoluble constituent of starch; the soluble constituent is amylose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally cassava starch is more digestible than maize starch, the former being higher in amylopectin (Gomes et al.
Scientists have found that the formation of helical inclusion complexes is primarily a property of amylose, while the long external branches of amylopectin are thought to have a limited ability to form complexes.
With the understanding that the two molecular chains, amylose and amylopectin are folded into granule and the fact that there are no two starch granules that are exactly same in terms of size, shape and configuration.
The end products maltotriose and maltose were found when pullulan was used as substrate while using starch or amylopectin as substrate main products were maltohexaose maltopentaose maltotetraose maltotriose maltose and glucose.
Hydroxy ethyl starch is a large, branched, complex carbohydrate derived by adding hydroxy ethyl groups to amylopectin.
If you're making beef stew and you want a potato that will hold its shape, use a variety that is high in amylopectin starch.
1958) determined critical surface tensions for wetting of 35-39N/m for starch, amylose and amylopectin films, 40 N/m for amylose triacetate and approximately 32 N/m for starch tributyrate.
There are two major molecular components in starch: 10-30% linear amylose and 70-90% branched amylopectin [58].
Its starch contents contain 25 per cent, amylose and 75 per cent amylopectin.
Composed primarily of the starch component amylopectin, the rice gelatinizes, giving it a glue-like consistency after cooking.
The amylopectin fraction on the other hand due to its branched structure has limited ability for hydrogen bonding and its solutions remain relatively clear and fluid [24].