amylodextrin

am·y·lo·dex·trin

(am'i-lō-deks'trin),
End product of hydrolysis of amylopectin by β-amylase; further hydrolysis requires amylo-1,6-glucosidase, which attacks the branch points. Identified by its color reaction with iodine (amylodextrin turns blue). Compare: achroodextrin, erythrodextrin.

amylodextrin

(am″ĭ-lō-deks′trĭn) [ amylo- + dextrin]
A soluble substance produced during the hydrolysis of starch into sugar.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A combination of the carbohydrate, amylodextrin, and beta glucan, the main fiber in oats and barley, Oatrim has been licensed by the USDA to two manufacturers, Quaker and ConAgra.
The combination of beta glucan--a soluble fiber credited with the cholesterol-lowering property of oats--and amylodextrin makes Oatrim absorb water like a sponge and turn into a gel.