amygdalin


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amygdalin

 [ah-mig´dah-lin]
a glycoside from kernels and pits of bitter almonds, apricots, cherries, peaches, and apples, as well as certain other plant parts. Crushed and moistened residues release an enzyme that catalyzes a chemical reaction leading to release of hydrogen cyanide, so that excessive ingestion can be toxic. Preparations of amygdalin have been alleged to be anticancer agents, but this has never been scientifically proven. See also laetrile.

a·myg·da·lin

(ă-mig'dă-lin),
A cyanogenic glucoside present in almonds and seeds of other plants of the family Rosaceae; the principal component of laetrile. Emulsin splits amygdalin into benzaldehyde, d-glucose, and hydrocyanic acid.
Synonym(s): amygdaloside
[G. amygdala, almond, + -in]

amygdalin

(ə-mĭg′də-lĭn)
n.
A glycoside, C20H27NO11, commonly found in seeds and other plant parts of many members of the rose family, such as kernels of the apricot, peach, and bitter almond, which breaks down into hydrocyanic acid, benzaldehyde, and glucose.

amygdalin

A beta-cyanogenic glycoside structurally related to the semisynthetic laetrile, which is obtained from the seeds of certain fruits (e.g., Prunus dulcis). Amygdalin has been (incorrectly) used as a synonym for Laetrile.

amygdalin

A β-cyanogenic glycoside structurally related to the semisynthetic laetrile, derived from the seeds of certain fruits. See Laetrile.

a·myg·da·lin

(ă-mig'dă-lin)
A cyanogenic glucoside present in almonds and seeds of other plants of the family Rosaceae; the principal component of laetrile. Emulsin splits amygdalin into benzaldehyde, d-glucose, and hydrocyanic acid.
[G. amygdala, almond, + -in]

amygdalin

A glycoside found in the stones of bitter almonds, from which LAETRILE was isolated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Upon ingestion, amygdalin is hydrolyzed to cyanide by beta-glucuronidase in the small intestine [2].
Characteristics Results [beta]-Galactosidase - Arginine hydrolase + Lysine decarboxylase - Ornithine decarboxylase - The use of citric acid - [H.sub.2]S production - Urease - Tryptophan deaminase + Indole production - Acetoin production + Characteristics Results Gelatinase - Glucose fermentation/oxidation - Mannitol Fermentation/oxidation + Inositol fermentation/oxidation - Sorbitol fermentation/oxidation - Rhamnose fermentation/oxidation - sucrose fermentation/oxidation - Melibiose fermentation/oxidation - Amygdalin fermentation/oxidation + Arabinose fermentation/oxidation - +: presence of a trait; -: absence of a trait.
Test Reaction Fermentation/oxidation Glucose + Mannitol + Sucrose + Amygdalin + Inositol - Sorbitol - Rhammose - Melibiose - Arabinose - Acetoin production (Voges Proskauer) - Lysine decarboxylase + Ornithine decarboxylase + Citrate utilization + Tryptophane deaminase + Indole production + Gelatinase + Oxidase + P-galactosidase - H2S production - Urease - Nitrate/Nitrite reduction - Martins, ML.
API 20E[R] strips-API 20E[R] strips include enzymatic tests for fermentation or oxidation of glucose, mannitol, inositol, sorbitol, rhamnose, saccharose, melibiose, amygdalin, and arabinose, along with nitrate reduction to nitrite and nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas.
Laetrile, a compound chemically related to amygdalin, and found naturally in the pits of apricots and various other fruits, gained notoriety as a focus of political activities intended to abolish the laws protecting Americans from quackery.
The B17 pills - called Laetrile or Amygdalin - are illegal to sell in the US after trials proved they had no effect on the killer disease.
Plums also contain insignificantly low levels of a substance called amygdalin, a compound that produces cyanide.
Davignon, "A Clinical Trial of Amygdalin (Laetrile) in the Treatment of Human Cancer," New England Journal of Medicine 306, no.
Banned in the US, laetrile is rebounding on the Internet, sometimes sold under the aliases amygdalin or Vitamin B17.
However, some seeds or pits (apricots, apples, cherries, plums, pears, and bitter almond) contain a small amount of amygdalin, which releases cyanide, a poison.
Similarly, Colorado and New Jersey both permit the prescription use of the unapproved Laetrile (amygdalin) provided warnings are given to patients.