amygdala

(redirected from amygdale)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to amygdale: amygdala

amygdala

 [ah-mig´dah-lah]
1. an almond-shaped structure.

a·myg·da·la

, gen. and pl.

a·myg·da·lae

(ă-mig'dă-lă, -lē),
1. The lymphatic tonsils (pharyngeal, palatine, lingual, laryngeal, and tubal).
2. General term used for the amygdaloid body [TA], which is thought to assess and assign emotional valence to somatic, visceral, and olfactory sensory input.
[L. fr. G. amygdalē, almond; in Mediev. & Mod. L., a tonsil]

amygdala

/amyg·da·la/ (ah-mig´dah-lah)
1. almond.
2. an almond-shaped structure.

amygdala

(ə-mĭg′də-lə)
n. pl. amygda·lae (-lē)
Either of two small, almond-shaped masses of gray matter that are part of the limbic system and are located in the temporal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres. Also called amygdaloid nucleus.

amygdala

[amig′dələ]
Etymology: Gk, amygdale, almond

a·myg·da·la

, gen. and pl. amygdalae (ă-mig'dă-lă, -lē)
Denoting the cerebellar tonsil, as well as the lymphatic tonsils (pharyngeal, palatine, lingual, laryngeal, and tubal).
[L. fr. G. amygdalē, almond; in Mediev. & Mod. L., a tonsil]

amygdala

An almond-shaped brain nucleus at the front of the temporal lobe. The amygdala is concerned with memory registration.

amygdala (·migˑ·d·l),

n a key component of the limbic system in the brain, involved in the experience of anxiety, distress, and fear.

amygdala

1. the corpus amygdaloideum.
2. (rare) a tonsil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the real and possible (medical and social) consequences of the described alternations, at one hand, and the "protectoral" function of fear, when a person is faced with a certain risk or an unpleasant intervention and another social role of amygdales, on the other, we do not find enough arguments that fear or disgust can be rejected as nonscientific or irrational human reactions.
This study was aimed at recognising natural zeolites filling amygdales and veins in tertiary basaltic host rocks on the Isle of Skye (NW Scotland) for their mineralogical characterisation and determining the sequence of zeolite formation of and that of associated minerals.
With respect to anxiety and arousal, in animal studies, OXT has been shown to potentiate the anxiolytic effect of diazepam through its action on the amygdale and inhibits the norepinepherine system's arousal of the sympathetic nervous system, while increasing parasympathetic tone.
There is accumulated evidence that the amygdaloid complex of nuclei such as amygdale, representing the central emotional management within the human brain, gives emotional (affective) tone to the input sensory information even before its conscious processing (Simic and Goran 2009).
Prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, limbic system and amygdale are words commonly found on WebMD.
In the case of chronic stress there is progressive damage to some structures of the nervous system and in particular there is an atrophy of the apical dendrite of the neurons of the hippocampus, of the amygdale and damages to the dendrite of the neurons of the prefrontal cortex.
A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of amygdale and medial prefrontal cortex responses to overtly presented fearful faces in PTSD," Arch.
6) The amygdale, (also part of the limbic system) creates emotional content for memories, mediating depression, irritability, and hostility/aggression, and governing reaction and responses to fear.
Lindstrom says a region known as Brodmann Area 10, for example, is active when we think something is cool or hip; the right mesial prefrontal cortex is tied to the tendency to collect things; the nucleus accumbens, known as "the craving spot," plays a role in addiction and reward; and the amygdale handles responses to fear.
Acquisition of a spatial conditioned place preference is impaired by amygdale lesions and improved by fornix lesions.
Dissociation between theory of mind and executive functions in a patient with early left amygdale damage.
Is the human amygdale specialized for processing social information?